UX for Lean Startups


Laura Klein - 2013
    With this practical, hands-on book, you’ll learn how to do it faster and smarter using Lean UX techniques. UX expert Laura Klein shows you what it takes to gather valuable input from customers, build something they’ll truly love, and reduce the time it takes to get your product to market.No prior experience in UX or design is necessary to get started. If you’re an entrepreneur or an innovator, this book puts you right to work with proven tips and tools for researching, identifying, and designing an intuitive, easy-to-use product.Determine whether people will buy your product before you build itListen to your customers throughout the product’s lifecycleUnderstand why you should design a test before you design a productGet nine tools that are critical to designing your productDiscern the difference between necessary features and nice-to-havesLearn how a Minimum Viable Product affects your UX decisionsUse A/B testing in conjunction with good UX practicesSpeed up your product development process without sacrificing quality

Service Design Patterns: Fundamental Design Solutions for SOAP/WSDL and RESTful Web Services


Robert Daigneau - 2011
    In this time, developers and architects have encountered a number of recurring design challenges related to their usage, and have learned that certain service design approaches work better than others to solve certain problems.   In Service Design Patterns, Rob Daigneau codifies proven design solutions for web services that follow the REST architectural style or leverage the SOAP/WSDL specifications. This catalogue identifies the fundamental topics in web service design and lists the common design patterns for each topic. All patterns identify the context in which they may be used, explain the constituent design elements, and explore the relative strengths and trade-offs. Code examples are provided to help you better understand how the patterns work but are kept general so that you can see how the solutions may be applied to disparate technologies that will inevitably change in the years to come.   This book will help readers answer the following questions: How do you create a web service API, what are the common API styles, and when should a particular style be used? How can clients and web services communicate, and what are the foundations for creating complex conversations in which multiple parties exchange data over extended periods of time? What are the options for implementing web service logic, and when should a particular approach be used? How can clients become less coupled to the underlying systems used by a service? How can information about a web service be discovered? How can generic functions like authentication, validation, caching, and logging be supported on the client or service? What changes to a service cause clients to break? What are the common ways to version a service? How can web services be designed to support the continuing evolution of business logic without forcing clients to constantly upgrade?  This book is an invaluable resource for enterprise architects, solution architects, and developers who use web services to create enterprise IT applications, commercial or open source products, and Software as a Service (SaaS) products that leverage emerging Cloud platforms.

Building Scalable Web Sites


Cal Henderson - 2006
    Culled from the experience of the Flickr.com lead developer, Building Scalable Web Sites offers techniques for creating fast sites that your visitors will find a pleasure to use. Creating popular sites requires much more than fast hardware with lots of memory and hard drive space. It requires thinking about how to grow over time, how to make the same resources accessible to audiences with different expectations, and how to have a team of developers work on a site without creating new problems for visitors and for each other. Presenting information to visitors from all over the world Integrating email with your web applications Planning hardware purchases and hosting options to have as much as you need without breaking your wallet Partitioning and distributing databases to support large datasets and simultaneous transactions Monitoring your applications to find and clear bottlenecks * Providing services APIs and using services from other providers to increase your site's reach and capabilities Whether you're starting a small web site with hopes of growing big or you already have a large system that needs maintenance, you'll find Building Scalable Web Sites to be a library of ideas for making things work.

Defensive Design for the Web: How to Improve Error Messages, Help, Forms, and Other Crisis Points


Matthew Linderman - 2004
    Good site defense can make or break the customer experience. This book shows the right (and wrong) ways to get defensive, offers guidelines to prevent errors and rescue customers if a breakdown occurs.It also shows you how to evaluate and improve your own site's defensive design.

Bulletproof Web Design: Improving flexibility and protecting against worst-case scenarios with XHTML and CSS


Dan Cederholm - 2005
    If you get this guide, you can be assured it will! By deconstructing a series of real-world Web sites, author and Web designer extraordinaire Dan Cederholm outlines 10 strategies for creating standards-based designs that provide flexibility, readability, and user control—key components of every successful Web site. Each chapter starts out with an example of what Dan refers to as an “unbulletproof” concept—an existing site that employs a traditional approach and its associated pitfalls. Dan then deconstructs that approach, noting its downsides and then making the site over using Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). By the end of each chapter, you’ll have replaced traditional, bloated, inaccessible page components with lean markup and CSS. The guide culminates with a chapter that pieces together all of the page components discussed in prior chapters into a single page template.

Homepage Usability: 50 Websites Deconstructed


Jakob Nielsen - 2001
    The 50 sites fall under such categories as Fortune 500 Sites, Highest-Traffic Sites, and E-Commerce Sites. The content is simply presented: Four book pages are devoted to each homepage. The first page is a clean screenshot of the site's homepage (for readers to make their own, unbiased judgments), followed by a page that explains the site's purpose and summarizes its success--or failure--at usabilty. The third and fourth pages are devoted to crtiques, where Jakob and Marie present no-holds-barred commentary for specific usability practices, as well as suggestions for improvement. Although only the homepage of each site is analyzed, many of the critiques can be applied to overall website design.

JavaScript Web Applications


Alex MacCaw - 2011
    This hands-on book takes proficient JavaScript developers through all the steps necessary to create state-of-the-art applications, including structure, templating, frameworks, communicating with the server, and many other issues.Throughout the book, you'll work with real-world example applications to help you grasp the concepts involved. Learn how to create JavaScript applications that offer a more responsive and improved experience.Use the Model-View-Controller (MVC) pattern, and learn how to manage dependencies inside your applicationGet an introduction to templating and data bindingLearn about loading remote data, Ajax, and cross-domain requestsCreate realtime applications with WebSockets and Node.jsAccept dropped files and upload data with progress indicatorsUse major frameworks and libraries, including jQuery, Spine, and BackboneWrite tests and use the console to debug your applicationsGet deployment best practices, such as caching and minification

Outcomes Over Output: Why customer behavior is the key metric for business success


Josh Seiden - 2019
    But in today’s service- and software-driven world, “done” is less obvious. When is Amazon done? When is Google done? Or Facebook? In reality, services powered by digital systems are never done. So then how do we give teams a goal that they can work on?Mostly, we simply ask teams to build features—but features are the wrong way to go. We often build features that create no value. Instead, we need to give teams an outcome to achieve. Using outcomes creates focus and alignment. It eliminates needless work. And it puts the customer at the center of everything you do.Setting goals as outcomes sounds simple, but it can be hard to do in practice. This book is a practical guide to using outcomes to guide the work of your team. "Josh’s crisp volume brims with insight about how to fly at just the right level - the level of outcomes. If you’ve ever wondered how M your MVP should be, or how to get more R in your OKRs, this book will help." --Nick Rockwell, CTO, NY Times

Programming Groovy


Venkat Subramaniam - 2008
    But recently, the industry has turned to dynamic languages for increased productivity and speed to market.Groovy is one of a new breed of dynamic languages that run on the Java platform. You can use these new languages on the JVM and intermix them with your existing Java code. You can leverage your Java investments while benefiting from advanced features including true Closures, Meta Programming, the ability to create internal DSLs, and a higher level of abstraction.If you're an experienced Java developer, Programming Groovy will help you learn the necessary fundamentals of programming in Groovy. You'll see how to use Groovy to do advanced programming including using Meta Programming, Builders, Unit Testing with Mock objects, processing XML, working with Databases and creating your own Domain-Specific Languages (DSLs).

Monolith to Microservices: Sustaining Productivity While Detangling the System


Sam Newman - 2019
    You'll learn several tried and tested patterns and techniques that you can use as you migrate your existing architecture.Ideal for organizations looking to transition to microservices, rather than rebuildHelps companies determine whether to migrate, when to migrate, and where to beginAddresses communication, integration, and the migration of legacy systemsDiscusses multiple migration patterns and where they applyProvides database migration examples, along with synchronization strategiesExplores application decomposition, including several architectural refactoring patternsDelves into details of database decomposition, including the impact of breaking referential and transactional integrity, new failure modes, and more

Single Page Web Applications


Michael S. Mikowski - 2012
    You'll learn the SPA design approach, and then start exploring new techniques like structured JavaScript and responsive design. And you'll learn how to capitalize on trends like server-side JavaScript and NoSQL data stores, as well as new frameworks that make JavaScript more manageable and testable as a first-class language.About this BookIf your website is a jumpy collection of linked pages, you are behind. Single page web applications are your next step: pushing UI rendering and business logic to the browser and communicating with the server only to synchronize data, they provide a smooth user experience, much like a native application. But, SPAs can be hard to develop, manage, and test.Single Page Web Applications shows how your team can easily design, test, maintain, and extend sophisticated SPAs using JavaScript end-to-end, without getting locked into a framework. Along the way, you'll develop advanced HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript skills, and use JavaScript as the language of the web server and the database.This book assumes basic knowledge of web development. No experience with SPAs is required.Purchase of the print book includes a free eBook in PDF, Kindle, and ePub formats from Manning Publications.What's InsideDesign, build, and test a full-stack SPA Best-in-class tools like jQuery, TaffyDB, Node.js, and MongoDB Real-time web with web sockets and Socket.IO Touch controls for tablets and smartphones Common SPA design mistakesAbout the AuthorsThe authors are architects and engineering managers. Michael Mikowski has worked on many commercial SPAs and a platform that processes over 100 billion requests per year. Josh Powell has built some of the most heavily trafficked sites on the web.Table of ContentsPART 1: INTRODUCING SPAS Our first single page application Reintroducing JavaScript PART 2: SPA CLIENT Develop the Shell Add feature modules Build the Model Finish the Model and Data modules PART 3: THE SPA SERVER The web server The server database Readying our SPA for production

REST API Design Rulebook


Mark Masse - 2011
    This concise book presents a set of API design rules, drawn primarily from best practices that stick close to the Web’s REST architectural style. Along with rules for URI design and HTTP use, you’ll learn guidelines for media types and representational forms. REST APIs are ubiquitous, but few of them follow a consistent design methodology. Using these simple rules, you will design web service APIs that adhere to recognized web standards. To assist you, author Mark Massé introduces the Web Resource Modeling Language (WRML), a conceptual framework he created for the design and implementation of REST APIs. Learn design rules for addressing resources with URIs Apply design principles to HTTP’s request methods and response status codes Work with guidelines for conveying metadata through HTTP headers and media types Get design tips to address the needs of client programs, including the special needs of browser-based JavaScript clients Understand why REST APIs should be designed and configured, not coded

Humans vs Computers


Gojko Adzic - 2017
    You'll read about humans who are invisible to computers, how a default password once caused a zombie apocalypse and why airlines sometimes give away free tickets. This is also a book on how to prevent, avoid and reduce the impact of such problems. Our lives are increasingly tracked, monitored and categorised by software, driving a flood of information into the vast sea of big data. In this brave new world, humans can't cope with information overload. Governments and companies alike rely on computers to automatically detect fraud, predict behaviour and enforce laws. Inflexible automatons, barely smarter than a fridge, now make life-changing decisions. Clever marketing tricks us into believing that phones, TV sets and even cars are somehow smart. Yet all those computer systems were created by people - people who are well-meaning but fallible and biased, clever but forgetful, and who have grand plans but are pressed for time. Digitising a piece of work doesn't mean there will be no mistakes, but instead guarantees that when mistakes happen, they'll run at a massive scale. The next time you bang your head against a digital wall, the stories in this book will help you understand better what's going on and show you where to look for problems. If nothing else, when it seems as if you're under a black-magic spell, these stories will at least allow you to see the lighter side of the binary chaos. For people involved in software delivery, this book will help you find more empathy for people suffering from our mistakes, and discover heuristics to use during analysis, development or testing to make your software less error prone. <

User Stories Applied: For Agile Software Development


Mike Cohn - 2004
    In simple terms, user stories represent an effective means of gathering requirements from the customer (roughly akin to use cases). This book describes user stories and demonstrates how they can be used to properly plan, manage, and test software development projects. The book highlights both successful and unsuccessful implementations of the concept, and provides sets of questions and exercises that drive home its main points. After absorbing the lessons in this book, readers will be able to introduce user stories in their organizations as an effective means of determining precisely what is required of a software application.

AngularJS: Up and Running: Enhanced Productivity with Structured Web Apps


Shyam Seshadri - 2014
    By the end of the book, you'll understand how to develop a large, maintainable, and performant application with AngularJS.Guided by two engineers who worked on AngularJS at Google, you'll learn the components needed to build data-driven applications, using declarative programming and the Model-view-controller pattern. You'll also learn how to conduct unit tests on each part of your application.Learn how to use controllers for moving data to and from viewsUnderstand when to use AngularJS services instead of controllersCommunicate with the server to store, fetch, and update data asynchronouslyKnow when to use AngularJS filters for converting data and values to different formatsImplement single-page applications, using ngRoute to select views and navigationDive into basic and advanced directives for creating reusable componentsWrite an end-to-end test on a live version of your entire applicationUse best practices, guidelines, and tools throughout the development cycle