The Quickwrite Handbook: 100 Mentor Texts to Jumpstart Your Students' Thinking and Writing


Linda Rief - 2018
    I don't have anything to write about! they say. And when writing does happen, how do you help them develop these ideas into more effective pieces?A powerful tool to jumpstart writingIn The Quickwrite Handbook, master teacher Linda Rief shares 100 compelling mentor texts and shows how to use each one as a powerful tool for sparking successful writing. Each mentor text includes Try this suggestions for inviting students to get started. You'll also find Interludes woven throughout: examples of quickwrites that students crafted into more fully developed pieces.These mentor texts are curated in four categories:Seeing Inward How do students view themselves?Leaning Outward What do students consider when they step outside of themselves?Beyond Self What do students notice and wonder about the world at large?Looking Back How does reflection help students grow into more articulate, thoughtful citizens of the world? Quickwrites go beyond writing promptsThe pages of this book champion Linda's wise words: Quickwrites-writing to find writing-are a powerful teaching tool that help students find ideas, discover their voices, and build their confidence as they discover they have important things to say.Quickwrites are more than a set of formulaic prompts. They are opportunities for students to use another writer's words to stimulate their thinking and-through writing themselves-to discover a voice they didn't know they had.

What You Know by Heart: How to Develop Curriculum for Your Writing Workshop


Katie Wood Ray - 2002
    It goes to the heart of where good ideas for teaching of good writing originate: from yourself and your own experience.As Katie shows, the most profound and effective curriculum can result from your own deep understanding of quality writing-what you know about writing through your own and others' writings and through your reading. And the best teaching can result from what you can wrap your heart and mind around and communicate to your students. It is this very personal approach and contagious enthusiasm that Katie brings to bear on creating curriculum for her own writing workshops. Her book shows how you can do it for your own.In Part One, Katie takes a close look at the lines of thinking you can use to find curriculum in your own writing experiences. In Part Two, she shows how to use the same lines of thinking to find curriculum in your everyday reading life. Along with her own inimitable writing style, Katie sprinkles special features throughout her book as helpful tips for thinking about your own writing workshop and curriculum development, including:minilessons and curriculum chunks Thinking it Through boxes with questions and things to try understandings and strategies notebook-keeping tips accompanied by Katie's own handwritten journal entries transcripts of interviews with writers references for further reading. Follow Katie's example. Write like a teacher of writing. Read like a teacher of writing. Then teach from your own experience. And watch as you and your students flourish like never before.

Minds Made for Stories: How We Really Read and Write Informational and Persuasive Texts


Thomas Newkirk - 2014
    Newkirk convincingly shows that effective argument is already a kind of narrative and is deeply entwined with narrative. --Gerald Graff, former MLA President and author of Clueless in AcademeNarrative is regularly considered a type of writing-often an easy one, appropriate for early grades but giving way to argument and analysis in later grades. This groundbreaking book challenges all that. It invites readers to imagine narrative as something more-as the primary way we understand our world and ourselves. To deny the centrality of narrative is to deny our own nature, Newkirk explains. We seek companionship of a narrator who maintains our attention, and perhaps affection. We are not made for objectivity and pure abstraction-for timelessness. We have 'literary minds that respond to plot, character, and details in all kind of writing. As humans, we must tell stories.When we are engaged readers, we are following a story constructed by the author, regardless of the type of writing. To sustain a reading-in a novel, an opinion essay, or a research article- we need a plot that helps us comprehend specific information, or experience the significance of an argument. As Robert Frost reminds us, all good memorable writing is dramatic.Minds Made for Stories is a needed corrective to the narrow and compartmentalized approaches often imposed on schools-approaches which are at odds with the way writing really works outside school walls.

The 9 Rights of Every Writer: A Guide for Teachers


Vicki Spandel - 2005
    Efforts to define and then assess the key qualities of writing have helped pinpoint what outcomes matter most and how to measure them, yet they threaten to become an end in themselves. Meanwhile, high-quality instruction seeks to create a safe environment that applauds risk taking by supporting students through strategies that are not readily measured. In this landmark book, Vicki Spandel takes on the immeasurable, opening an exciting discussion about the conditions writers need to achieve their full potential and offering practical applications for any writing classroom.In The 9 Rights of Every Writer Spandel invites nine published authors into a discussion of what makes writing work. Well-known novelists, researchers, science writers, and teacher-writers join this dynamic conversation, and together they draw vital conclusions about teaching strategies that both lead to growth in craft and allow good teaching to flourish. Join Spandel and friends in discovering the personal and instructional importance of:reflecting finding personally important topics going off topic personalizing the writing process writing badly to unearth and clarify meaning observing other writers at work assessing constructivelyand well experiencing structural freedom unearthing the power of each writer's voice. As you will discover, The 9 Rights of Every Writer weaves the philosophical into the practical, offering powerful, ready-to-use lessons that jumpstart the progress of the writers in your classroom and help them reach writing standards. Harness your passion for writing instruction, let go of rigid practices, and balance the needs of maturing writers with today's classroom realities. Read The 9 Rights of Every Writer, learn to trust your teaching instincts, and concentrate on what matters most: creating an instructional setting where writers can achieve success that soars beyond what can be measured.

That Workshop Book: New Systems and Structures for Classrooms That Read, Write, and Think


Samantha Bennett - 2007
     Cris Tovani Twenty-five years after Donald Graves popularized workshop teaching, the concept is widely implemented but not always deeply understood. That Workshop Book changes all that. It shows a new generation of teachers how the systems, structures, routines, and rituals that support successful workshops combine with thinking, planning, and conferring to drive students growth, inform assessment and instruction, and increase teachers professional satisfaction. And it shows those already using the workshop how to increase its instructional power by seeing its big ideas and its component parts in fresh, dynamic ways. In That Workshop Book, Samantha Bennett, a veteran instructional coach, takes you on a tour of six classrooms from first grade through eighth grade to see the techniques and thought processes master teachers use to make their workshops work. In each class she offers tangible evidence of these teachers practices, demonstrating how they listen to students and use that information to build lessons that propel children into deeper thinking. She documents these teachers moves for you with: classroom observations in the form of coaching emails from Bennett to each with commentary that highlights the important practices seen in each workshop transcripts of minilessons, worktimes, and debriefs specific, explicit reflection by each teacher about their workshop examples of student work produced in the workshop and over time student reflections on their development as readers, writers, thinkers, and learners. Youll come to understand firsthand how the setup of the workshop allows students the breathing room to think deeply about ideas, topics, and resources. Youll also see how it creates a framework within which you can not only listen in as children express what they learn but also think deeply yourself about how best to use the information you gather for subsequent instruction. Bennett even demonstrates how the workshop can be flexible enough to fit any learning situation and how to solve common problems as they arise. Benefit from the wisdom of one of the countrys foremost staff developers. Step inside workshop classrooms where teachers and students work side by sidewhere students develop literacy skills through a combination of doing what readers and writers do and purposeful, sensitive interactions with their teacher. Visit workshops where teachers learn about their students, use careful one-to-one assessment to inform their teaching, and reflect on their own practice as well. Then enter the best workshop classroom of allthe one youll be ready and excited to launch when you read That Workshop Book.

Writing about Reading: From Book Talk to Literary Essays, Grades 3-8


Janet Angelillo - 2003
    She shows us how to teach students to manage all the thinking and questioning that precedes their putting pen to paper. More than that, she offers us smarter ways to have students write about their reading that can last them a lifetime. She demonstrates how students' responses to reading canstart in a notebook, in conversation, or in a read aloud lead to thinking guided by literary criticism reflect deeper text analysis and honest writing processes result in a variety of popular genres--book reviews, author profiles, commentaries, editorials, and the literary essay. She even includes tools for teaching-day-by-day units of study, teaching points, a sample minilesson, and lots of student examples-plus chapters on yearlong planning and assessment. Ensure that your students will be readers and writers long after they leave you. Get them enthused and empowered to use whatever they read-facts, statistics, the latest book--as fuel for writing in school and in their working lives. Read Angelillo.

Teaching Students to Read Like Detectives: Comprehending, Analyzing, and Discussing Text


Douglas Fisher - 2011
    The authors explore the important relationship between text, learner, and learning. With an array of methods and assignments to establish critical literacy in a discussion-based and reflective classroom, you ll encourage students to find meaning and cultivate thinking from even the most challenging expository texts."

One to One: The Art of Conferring with Young Writers


Lucy Calkins - 2005
    And after 30 years of studying her students' growth in the writing workshop, Lucy Calkins knows one of the most powerful ways to support good writers: clear, purposeful writing conferences.In One to One Calkins and her colleagues Amanda Hartman and Zoe White show you the practices and principles that create effective conferences. They dispel the myth that master teachers have a magic touch and show you that effective teachers do not reinvent the conference with each student, but rather use predictable, principled interactions that follow a few simple frameworks. In One to One, you will learn:repeatable conferring frameworks that are the foundation of effective conferring specific teaching methods that you can match to your students' needs strategies for tailoring conferences to English language learners ways to use conferring across the content areas on-the-run record-keeping systems that are efficient, powerful teaching tools. Good conferring, like good teaching, relies on your ability to communicate effectively with children, and the skills you develop as you learn to confer will improve your teaching abilities in all areas, including developing curriculum, leading strong minilessons, and untangling the classroom chaos that can derail a smoothly running workshop. Read One to One to improve your conferences and your teaching. But most important, read it to improve your students' writing every day.

Papers, Papers, Papers: An English Teacher's Survival Guide


Carol Jago - 2005
    Guilt mounts. Students want to know when their papers will come back. Grading begins consuming all your energy, your weekends, your life.Grading papers is a fact of life, especially in English classrooms, and the paper load is a leading cause of teacher burnout. Fortunately, Carl Jago's here to help, and in Papers, Papers, Papers, she offers you advice honed from thirty-one years in the English classroom and forty-five thousand papers worth of grading. You'll not only get through stacks of papers, but you'll do so accurately, completely, and with the time you need to give each and every student in your classes the attention they deserve.Ever practical and always professional, Jago suggests techniques that can be implemented right away to turn your mountain of essays into a foothill. She covers every aspect of attentive grading, including:responding to student drafts commenting rather than correcting using scoring guides and rubrics for common expectations fostering improvement from one paper to the next effective peer- and self-editing suggestions for alternatives to essays. With all this and her Ten Tips for Handling the Paper Load, Carol Jago gives you everything you need to keep on top of student papers.

After the End: Teaching and Learning Creative Revision


Barry Lane - 1992
    He encourages both teachers and students to enjoy a sense of discovery and surprise in their writing, as well as to examine and explore their own distinct revising styles."After" "THE END" revises our concept of revision, illustrating it as a constant inventive search for new possibilities and divergent meanings, rather than mere correction or what students wearily refer to as "redoing." For students in upper elementary to secondary school and beyond, and for every teacher looking to develop a common language of craft in the classroom, "After ""THE END" is a book of practical ideas and applications that inspire the reader to put it down and put it to use.

The Writing Strategies Book: Your Everything Guide to Developing Skilled Writers


Jennifer Serravallo - 2017
    Now, in The Writing Strategies Book, Jen Serravallo does the same, collecting 300 of the most effective strategies to share with writers, and grouping them beneath 10 crucial goals.You can think of the goals as the what, writes Jen, and the strategies as the how. From composing with pictures all the way to conventions and beyond, you'll have just-right teaching, just in time. With Jen's help you'll:develop individual goals for every writer give students step-by-step strategies for writing with skill and craft coach writers using prompts aligned to a strategy present mentor texts that support a genre and strategy adjust instruction to meet individual needs with Jen's Teaching Tips demonstrate and explain a writing move with her Lesson Language learn more with Hat Tips to the work of influential teacher-authors. She even offers suggestions for stocking your writing center, planning units of study, celebrating student writing, and keeping records.Whether you use Writing Workshop, 6+1 Traits, Daily 5's Work on Writing, a scripted writing program, the writing exercises in your basal, or any other approach, you'll discover a treasure chest of ways to work with whole classes, small groups, or individual writers.I am convinced that helping kids to articulate clear goals for their work, writes Jen Serravallo, and supporting them with strategies and feedback to accomplish those goals, makes a huge difference. With The Writing Strategies Book you can make that kind of difference with your writers every day.

Rethinking Rubrics in Writing Assessment


Maja Wilson - 2006
    But sometimes it's better to be unconventional. In Rethinking Rubrics in Writing Assessment, Maja Wilson offers a new perspective on rubrics and argues for a better, more responsive way to think about assessing writers' progress.Though you may sense a disconnect between student-centered teaching and rubric-based assessment, you may still use rubrics for convenience or for want of better alternatives. Rethinking Rubrics in Writing Assessment gives you the impetus to make a change, demonstrating how rubrics can hurt kids and replace professional decision making with an inauthentic pigeonholing that stamps standardization onto a notably nonstandard process. With an emphasis on thoughtful planning and teaching, Wilson shows you how to reconsider writing assessment so that it aligns more closely with high-quality instruction and avoids the potentially damaging effects of rubrics.Stop listening to the conventional wisdom, and turn instead to a compelling new voice to find out why rubrics are often replaceable. Open Rethinking Rubrics in Writing Assessment and let Maja Wilson start you down the path to more sensitive, authentic style of writing assessment.

Teaching Adolescent Writers


Kelly Gallagher - 2006
    From the requirements of standardized tests to those of the wired workplace, the ability to write well, once a luxury, has become a necessity. Many students are leaving school without the necessary writing practice and skills needed to compete in a complex and fast-moving Information Age. Unless we teach them how to run with it, they are in danger of being run over by a stampede—a literacy stampede.In Teaching Adolescent Writers, Kelly Gallagher, author of Reading Reasons and Deeper Reading, shows how students can be taught to write effectively. Kelly shares a number of classroom-tested strategies that enable teachers to:understand the importance of teaching writing;motivate young writers;see the importance modeling plays in building young writers (modeling from both the teacher and from real-world text);understand how providing choice elevates adolescent writing (and how to allow for choice within a rigorous curriculum);help students recognize the importance of purpose and audience;assess essays in ways that drive better writing performance.Infused with humor and illuminating anecdotes, Kelly draws on his classroom experiences and work as co-director of a regional writing project to offer teachers both practical ways to incorporate writing instruction into their day and compelling reasons to do so.

The Writing Thief: Using Mentor Texts to Teach the Craft of Writing


Ruth Culham - 2014
    Writing thieves read widely, dive deeply into texts, and steal bits and pieces from great texts as models for their own writing. Ruth Culham admits to being a writing thief-and she wants you and your students to become writing thieves, too! A major part of becoming a writing thief is finding the right mentor texts to share with students. Within this book, discover more than 90 excellent mentor texts, along with straight-forward activities that incorporate the traits of writing across informational, narrative, and argument modes. Chapters also include brief essays from beloved writing thieves such as Lester Laminack, David L. Harrison, Lisa Yee, Nicola Davies, Ralph Fletcher, Toni Buzzeo, Lola Schaefer, and Kate Messner, detailing the reading that has influenced their own writing. Ruth's beloved easy-going style and friendly tone make this a book you'll turn to again and again as you guide your students to reach their full potential as deep, thoughtful readers and great writers. There's a writing thief in each of us when we learn how to read with a writer's eye!

Banish Boring Words!: Dozens of Reproducible Word Lists for Helping Students Choose Just-Right Words to Strengthen Their Writing


Leilen Shelton - 2009
    A quick-reference guide for teachers and students to use during writing lessons and for independent work.