Understanding the British: A hilarious guide from Apologising to Wimbledon


Adam Fletcher - 2019
    The British are not who you think they are...In fact, they’re not even who they think they are...Come on a tour of the most misunderstood people on Earth!Throwing away all the usual, boring stereotypes, author (and Brit) Adam Fletcher will explain:- What cricket has to do with the Grim Reaper.- When you shouldn’t say sorry.- The real reason Brexit happened.- Which secret religion every Brit is a member of.- The twenty most annoying phrases in the English language.- What every Brit automatically does when left alone.- The revolutionary hangover cure invented in Scotland.- The thing his people are most scared of (hint: it can fly).- The secret ideology behind roundabouts.- The Ten Commandments of British humour.And much more.Bonus: includes a How British Are You? quiz that will reveal just how well you understand the British mentality.

Liberalism: Find a Cure


Mark Dice - 2018
    Every day we are inundated by news reports, trending topics on social media, and new political movements promoting such bizarre beliefs about race, gender, sexuality, and life in general, that it’s impossible in many cases to distinguish whether such ideas are serious or if they’re a parody of what liberalism has become. The political differences between liberals and conservatives used to be pretty well established, but recently the tug of war between the Left and the Right took a dramatic and disturbing turn. Modern liberalism has been replaced with new mind-boggling agendas promoting the adoption of unscientific, authoritarian, and sociologically disastrous ideologies. In attempts to accomplish their plans, the Left are conspiring to end freedom of speech, traditional families, long-cherished holidays, and hope to implement a new world order. Who is behind this madness? What is their ultimate goal? How far are they willing to go to achieve it? And what can we do to stop them? Bestselling author and media analyst Mark Dice takes you on a tour inside the minds of those constructing this new social landscape in his groundbreaking investigation: Liberalism: Find a Cure.

Out of Iran: One Woman's Escape from the Ayatollahs


Sousan Azadi - 1987
    In her privileged circles the thunder of approaching revolution was easy to ignore. Then the Shah fell and in the terrifying new fundamentalist regime of Ayatollah Khomeini Sousan and her friends were branded taghouti, devil's followers. They were hunted, their children brainwashed, their property confiscated. Alone with her son after the death of her husband, Sousan became an easy target. She was flung into jail, where she witnessed terrible suffering inflicted in the name of 'immodest behaviour' and 'indecency.' Only when she caught the eye of a Mullah, who clearly expected sexual favours in return, did she escape. But real freedom still lay beyond the snow-capped Zagros mountains, in Turkey- a hazardous route for a woman and child to take. OUT OF IRAN grips and involves the reader as it recounts one woman's courageous struggle for survival in fanatical war-torn Iran.

13 Ways to Kill Your Community


Doug Griffiths - 2010
    One can imagine readers seeking out information on boosting their local community sighing dutifully as they seek out material and then being relieved and delighted when what they find turns out to be as entertaining as it is informative. The information provided is sometimes startling and often positively revelatory. The anecdotes and examples are delivered with wit and a little bit of a dishy factor. But underneath all the fun is a clear breadth of experience, and a no-nonsense, practical approach to community building, which can be easily grasped. 13 Ways to Kill Your Community offers practical, implementable steps that can be taken to bring a moribund community back to life. This book delivers what it promises, and it does so with wit and warmth.

Global Village Idiot: Dubya, Dunces, and One Last Word Before You Vote


John O'Farrell - 2001
    “Just when we thought the lawlessness in Iraq was over,” O’Farrell observes, “even more blatant incidents of looting have begun. With handkerchiefs masking their faces, two rioters roughly the height of George Bush and Donald Rumsfeld kicked in the gates of the largest oilfield and grabbed the keys of the gasoline trucks. ‘Yee-haw! It’s all ours! Millions of barrels of the stuff’ they laughed. ‘Yup!’ added the leader ‘ and this mask guarantees my anonymousinity!’ So after all these years there really is such a person as the Thief of Baghdad. Except strangely his accent sounded vaguely Texan.”A writer for the groundbreaking television show Spitting Image and contributor to the screenplay for the hit movie Chicken Run, O’Farrell meticulously researched his conclusions “by spending five minutes on the internet and then giving up.” And while O’Farrell’s sharpest barbs and stingers have often been written to come out of the mouths of grotesque puppets and Claymation chickens, this time around he keeps the best lines for himself: ‘‘With the election of the 43rd President of the United States, the global village is complete,” O’Farrell writes. “’It has its own global village idiot.’”

Dear President Trump: 50 Satirical Letters from Phoenix to the White House


William Friese - 2020
    

No Wall They Can Build


CrimethInc. - 2017
    Drawing on nearly a decade of solidarity work along the border, this book uncovers the true goals and costs of US border policy–and what to do about it.

One-Upmanship


Stephen Potter - 1952
    If one ignores social conventions, one runs the risk of being perceived as uneducated; however, following all common protocol pegs one as a nerd. With tongue in cheek, Potter reveals how to confound those who like to practice their one-upmanship. What's a one-upmanship? An angle of vision, a way of life, a series of gambits, ploys and devices - all of these and more, upmanship is an individual talent. Remember one final overwhelming truth: If you're not one up, you're one down.

A Decent Life: Morality for the Rest of Us


Todd May - 2019
    Even so, let’s face it: you could be a better person. We all could. But what does that mean for you?   In a world full of suffering and deprivation, it’s easy to despair—and it’s also easy to judge ourselves for not doing more. Even if we gave away everything we own and devoted ourselves to good works, it wouldn’t solve all the world’s problems. It would make them better, though. So is that what we have to do? Is anything less a moral failure? Can we lead a fundamentally decent life without taking such drastic steps?   Todd May has answers. He’s not the sort of philosopher who tells us we have to be model citizens who display perfect ethics in every decision we make. He’s realistic: he understands that living up to ideals is a constant struggle. In A Decent Life, May leads readers through the traditional philosophical bases of a number of arguments about what ethics asks of us, then he develops a more reasonable and achievable way of thinking about them, one that shows us how we can use philosophical insights to participate in the complicated world around us. He explores how we should approach the many relationships in our lives—with friends, family, animals, people in need—through the use of a more forgiving, if no less fundamentally serious, moral compass. With humor, insight, and a lively and accessible style, May opens a discussion about how we can, realistically, lead the good life that we aspire to.   A philosophy of goodness that leaves it all but unattainable is ultimately self-defeating. Instead, Todd May stands at the forefront of a new wave of philosophy that sensibly reframes our morals and redefines what it means to live a decent life.

Harry Hill's Whopping Great Joke Book


Harry Hill - 2008
    Containing Harry's favourite jokes picked from the world's joke archive, it also features jokes written by Harry, including some brand-new ones written specially for this book.

Armed America: Portraits of Gun Owners in Their Homes


Kyle Cassidy - 2007
    Hardly anyone he knew didn't have an opinion in the debate over owning guns. Why was a constitutionally protected right so heavily debated, and who exactly as these folks that own guns? "I began to wonder who these seventy or so million Americans were, how they lived and what was important to them. I set out to photographs as many gun owners as I could and ask them one question: "Why do you own a gun."Cassidy traveled over 20,000 miles, crisscrossing the country to meet with gun owners in their homes. Cassidy's photo essays create a powerful, thought provoking and sometimes startling view of gun ownership in the U.S. These "everyman" portraits, and the accompanying views of gun owners, fashion a riveting and provocative hardcover book.

The Brothers Bihari


Sankarshan Thakur - 2015
    One a charismatic populist, the other a shrewd introvert. Taken together a mesmerizing duo: heroes to some, villains to others, champions of the underdog yet imperious of manner; allies in youth, foes in midlife, now ageing veterans. For a quarter of a century, the two by turns dictated the destiny of Bihar. What do Laloo and Nitish mean to Bihar? Here, for the first time, an omnibus edition of Sankarshan Thakur’s widely acclaimed biographies of the men Subaltern Saheb and Single Man. From one of India’s finest journalists, this revised, updated and collected volume is essential reading to understand Bihar. In the lives of the two giants lies the arresting story of one of India’s largest and most challenging states.

The Art of Life


Zygmunt Bauman - 2008
    In this society we are all expected, rightly or wrongly, to give our lives purpose and form by using our own skills and resources, even if we lack the tools and materials with which artists' studios need to be equipped for the artist's work to be conceived and executed. And we are praised or censured for the results - for what we have managed or failed to accomplish and for what we have achieved and lost. In our liquid modern society we are also taught to believe that the purpose of the art of life should be and can be happiness - though it's not clear what happiness is, the images of a happy state keep changing and the state of happiness remains most of the time something yet-to-be-reached. This new book by Zygmunt Bauman - one of the most original and influential social thinkers writing today - is not a book of designs for the art of life nor a 'how to' book: the construction of a design for life and the way it is pursued is and cannot but be an individual responsibility and individual accomplishment. It is instead a brilliant account of conditions under which our designs-for-life are chosen, of the constraints that might be imposed on their choice and of the interplay of design, accident and character that shape their implementation. Last but not least, it is a study of the ways in which our society - the liquid modern, individualized society of consumers - influences (but does not determine) the way we construct and narrate our life trajectories.

The Misogyny Factor


Anne Summers - 2013
    Within weeks of their delivery Prime Minister Julia Gillard's own speech about misogyny and sexism went viral and was celebrated around the world. Summers makes the case that Australia, the land of the fair go, still hasn't figured out how to make equality between men and women work. She shows how uncomfortable we are with the idea of women with political and financial power, let alone the reality. Summers dismisses the idea that we should celebrate progress for women as opposed to outright success. She shows what success will look like.

A Wall in Palestine


René Backmann - 2009
    Declared illegal by the United Nations International Court of Justice, this network of concrete walls, trenches, and barbed-wire fences could permanently redraw one of the most disputed property lines in the Middle East--the Green Line that separates Israel and the West Bank. To Israel the "security fence" is intended to keep Palestinian terrorists from entering its territory. But to Palestinians the "apartheid wall" that sliced through orchards and houses, and cuts off family members from one another, is a land grab.In this comprehensive book, Backmann not only addresses the barrier's impact on ordinary citizens, but how it will shape the future of the Middle East. Though it promises security to an Israeli population weary of terrorism, it also is responsible for the widespread destruction of Palestinian homes and farmland; with its Byzantine checkpoint regulations, it has also severely crippled the Palestinian economy; and, most urgent, the barrier often deviates from the Green Line, appropriating thousands of acres of land, effectively redrawing the boundary between the West Bank and Israel.Backmann interviews Israeli policy makers, politicians, and military personnel, as well as Palestinians living throughout the West Bank, telling the stories not only of the barrier's architects, but also of those who must reckon with it on a day-to-day basis on the ground.With bold, brilliant, and often impassioned reportage, A Wall in Palestine renders the West Bank Barrier--its purpose, its efficacy, its consequences--as no book before.