Electronics for Dummies


Gordon McComb - 2005
    It quickly covers the essentials, and then focuses on the how-to instead of theory. It covers:Fundamental concepts such as circuits, schematics, voltage, safety, and more Tools of the trade, including multimeters, oscilloscopes, logic probes, and more Common electronic components (e.g. resistors, capacitors, transistors) Making circuits using breadboards and printed circuit boards Microcontrollers (implementation and programming) Author Gordon McComb has more than a million copies of his books in print, including his bestselling Robot Builder's Bonanza and VCRs and Camcorders For Dummies. He really connects with readers! With lots of photos and step-by-step explanations, this book will have you connecting electronic components in no time! In fact, it includes fun ideas for great projects you can build in 30 minutes or less. You'll be amazed! Then you can tackle cool robot projects that will amaze your friends! (The book gives you lots to choose from.)Students will find this a great reference and supplement to the typical dry, dull textbook. So whether you just want to bone up on electronics or want to get things hooked up, souped up, or fixed up, ...whether you're interested in fixing old electronic equipment, understanding guitar fuzz amps, or tinkering with robots, Electronics For Dummies is your quick connection to the stuff you need to know.

The Way Things Work


David Macaulay - 1988
    Full-color illustrations.

Mathematics for the Nonmathematician


Morris Kline - 1967
    But there is one other motive which is as strong as any of these — the search for beauty. Mathematics is an art, and as such affords the pleasures which all the arts afford." In this erudite, entertaining college-level text, Morris Kline, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at New York University, provides the liberal arts student with a detailed treatment of mathematics in a cultural and historical context. The book can also act as a self-study vehicle for advanced high school students and laymen. Professor Kline begins with an overview, tracing the development of mathematics to the ancient Greeks, and following its evolution through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance to the present day. Subsequent chapters focus on specific subject areas, such as "Logic and Mathematics," "Number: The Fundamental Concept," "Parametric Equations and Curvilinear Motion," "The Differential Calculus," and "The Theory of Probability." Each of these sections offers a step-by-step explanation of concepts and then tests the student's understanding with exercises and problems. At the same time, these concepts are linked to pure and applied science, engineering, philosophy, the social sciences or even the arts.In one section, Professor Kline discusses non-Euclidean geometry, ranking it with evolution as one of the "two concepts which have most profoundly revolutionized our intellectual development since the nineteenth century." His lucid treatment of this difficult subject starts in the 1800s with the pioneering work of Gauss, Lobachevsky, Bolyai and Riemann, and moves forward to the theory of relativity, explaining the mathematical, scientific and philosophical aspects of this pivotal breakthrough. Mathematics for the Nonmathematician exemplifies Morris Kline's rare ability to simplify complex subjects for the nonspecialist.

507 Mechanical Movements: Mechanisms and Devices


Henry T. Brown - 1984
    Spanning the first century of the Industrial Revolution, this 1868 compilation features simplified, concise illustrations of the mechanisms used in hydraulics, steam engines, pneumatics, presses, horologes, and scores of other machines.The movements of each of the 507 mechanisms are depicted in drawings on the left-hand page, and the facing page presents a brief description of the item's use and operation. Ranging from simple to intricately complex, the mechanisms offer a fascinating view of the variety of small components that constitute complex machinery. A detailed index provides easy reference to specific mechanisms.Inventors, tinkerers, and anyone with an interest in the history of invention and technology will find this volume a treasury of information and inspiration.

FREE Weights and Measures Study Guide: Conversion of over 1,000 units including Length, Area, Volume, Speed, Force, Energy, Electricity, Viscosity, Temperature, & more


MobileReference - 2007
    You will use it from high school to college and beyond. The full version is absolutely FREE. Features Conversion of over 1,000 units. Metric, English, and US customary systems. Length, Area, Volume, Speed, Force, Energy, Electricity, Viscosity, Temperature, and more. List of powers of 10 prefixes. Explanation of SI writing style. Approximate conversion of units. Clear and concise explanations. Difficult concepts are explained in simple terms. Navigate from Table of Contents or search for words or phrases. Add bookmarks and annotation. Access the guide anytime, anywhere - at home, on the train, in the subway. Use your down time to prepare for an exam. Always have the guide available for a quick reference. Indispensable resource for technical and life science students. The full version is absolutely FREE. FREE updates. Table of Contents Conversion of units: Length: Definition | Conversion Area: Definition | 2-D Formulae | 3-D Formulae | Conversion Volume: Definition | Formulae | Conversion Angle: Definition | Conversion Mass: Definition | Conversion Time: Definition | Conversion Speed: Definition | Conversion Acceleration: Definition | Conversion Force: Definition | Conversion Pressure or mechanical stress: Definition | Conversion Energy, work, or heat: Definition | Conversion Power: Definition | Conversion Angular momentum: Definition | Conversion Electricity: Current | Charge | Resistance | Voltage | Formulae | Conversion Viscosity: Definition | Conversion Information entropy: Definition | Conversion Temperature: Definition | Conversion Approximate conversion of units History: Systems of measurement | History of measurement Metric system (SI): Definition | SI writing style | Powers of 10 prefixes Other Systems: English system | Imperial unit | United States customary units | Comparison of the Imperial and U.S. customary systems

The Bottomless Well: The Twilight of Fuel, The Virtue of Waste, and Why We Will Never Run Out of Energy


Peter W. Huber - 2005
    But according to Peter Huber and Mark Mills, the things we "know" are mostly myths. In The Bottomless Well , Huber and Mills debunk the myths and show how a better understanding of energy will radically change our views and policies on a number of very controversial issues. They explain why demand will never go down, why most of what we think of as "energy waste" actually benefits us; why greater efficiency will never lead to energy conservation; and why the energy supply is infinite-it's quality of energy that's scarce and expensive. The Bottomless Well will also revolutionize our thinking about the automotive industry (gas prices don't matter and the hybrid engine is irrelevant), coal and uranium, the much-maligned power grid (it's the worst system we could have except for all the others), what energy supplies mean for jobs and GDP, and many other hotly debated subjects.

The Works of Archimedes


Archimedes
    Remarkable for his range of thought and his mastery of treatment, Archimedes addressed such topics as the famous problems of the ratio of the areas of a cylinder and an inscribed sphere; the measurement of a circle; the properties of conoids, spheroids, and spirals; and the quadrature of the parabola. This edition offers an informative introduction with many valuable insights into the ancient mathematician's life and thought as well as the views of his contemporaries. Modern mathematicians, physicists, science historians, and logicians will find this volume a source of timeless fascination.

Schaum's Outline of College Physics


Frederick J. Bueche - 2006
    Provides a review of introductory noncalculus-based physics for those who do not have a strong background in mathematics.

A Tour of the Calculus


David Berlinski - 1995
    Just how calculus makes these things possible and in doing so finds a correspondence between real numbers and the real world is the subject of this dazzling book by a writer of extraordinary clarity and stylistic brio. Even as he initiates us into the mysteries of real numbers, functions, and limits, Berlinski explores the furthest implications of his subject, revealing how the calculus reconciles the precision of numbers with the fluidity of the changing universe. "An odd and tantalizing book by a writer who takes immense pleasure in this great mathematical tool, and tries to create it in others."--New York Times Book Review

The Science Book: Big Ideas Simply Explained


Rob Colson - 2014
     The Science Book covers every area of science--astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, math, and physics, and brings the greatest scientific ideas to life with fascinating text, quirky graphics, and pithy quotes.

Amazing Leonardo da Vinci Inventions: You Can Build Yourself


Maxine Anderson - 2006
    Most of Leonardo's inventions were never made in his lifetime—they remained sketches in his famous notebooks. Amazing Leonardo da Vinci Inventions You Can Build Yourself shows you how to bring these ideas to life using common household supplies. Detailed step-by-step instructions, diagrams, and templates for creating each project combine with historical facts and anecdotes, biographies and trivia about the real-life models for each project. Together they give kids a first-hand look intothe amazing mind of one the world’s greatest inventors.

The Dangerous Book for Boys


Conn Iggulden - 2006
    This is a wonderful collection of all things that make being young, or young at heart, fun. Audio includes: Questions About the World, How to Play Stickball, The Rules of Soccer, Fishing, Famous Battles, Extraordinary Stories, Girls, First Aid, The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, Seven Modern Wonders of the World The perfect book for every boy from eight to eighty.

Introduction to Flight


John D. Anderson Jr. - 1978
    Introduction to Flight blends history and biography with discussion of engineering concepts, and shows the development of flight through this perspective. Anderson covers new developments in flight, including unmanned aerial vehicles, uninhabited combat aerial vehicles, and applications of CFD in aircraft design. Many new and revised problems have been added in this edition. Chapter learning features help readers follow the text discussion while highlighting key engineering and industry applications.

The Book of Potentially Catastrophic Science: 50 Experiments for Daring Young Scientists


Sean Connolly - 2010
    Round up all your friends and track the spread of "disease" using body glitter with an experiment inspired by Edward Jenner, the vaccination pioneer who's credited with saving more lives than any other person in history. Rediscover the wheel and axle with the ancient Sumerians, and perform an astounding experiment demonstrating the theory of angular momentum. Build a simple telescope—just like Galileo's—and find the four moons he discovered orbiting Jupiter (an act that helped land him in prison). Take a less potentially catastrophic approach to electricity than Ben Franklin did with the Lightning Mouth experiment. Re-create the Hadron Collider in a microwave with marshmallows, calculator, and a ruler—it won't jeopardize Earth with a simulated Big Bang, but will demonstrate the speed of light. And it's tasty!By letting kids stand on the shoulders of Aristotle, Newton, Einstein, the Wright brothers, Marie Curie, Darwin, Watson and Crick, and more, The Book of Potentially Catastrophic Science is an uncommonly engaging guide to science, and the great stories of the men and women behind the science.

How to Stay Alive in the Woods: A Complete Guide to Food, Shelter and Self-Preservation Anywhere


Bradford Angier - 1956
    Broken down into four essential sections, Sustenance, Warmth, Orientation and Safety, this enlightening manual reveals how to catch game without a gun, what plants to eat (full-color illustrations of these make identification simple), how to build a warm shelter, make clothing, protect yourself and signal for help. Detailed illustrations and expanded instructions offer crucial information at a glance, making How to Stay Alive in the Woods truly a lifesaver.