The Big Book of Bugs


Yuval Zommer - 2015
    The Big Book of Bugs is the first fact-filled book for children to explore the vast array of creepy-crawlies that share our Earth.In the first pages, children learn that bugs live nearly everywhere on the planet and gain tips on how to become a young bug spotter. As the book continues, the scenic compositions on each page are dedicated to key groups of bugs, including beetles, moths, butterflies, bees, snails, crickets, grasshoppers, worms, and spiders. Some spreads approach the world of bugs thematically, such as bugs that come out at night, baby bugs, and life cycles, how bugs hide and show off, and how some bugs love to live in your home. The conversational, funny text is also full of facts that will astonish children and adults, and accompanied by Yuval Zommer’s colorful illustrations.

Chickens Aren't the Only Ones: A Book About Animals that Lay Eggs


Ruth Heller - 1981
    Ruth Heller's prose and pictures are the perfect means for discovering the variety of oviparous animals and their unique ways of laying eggs.

I See a Kookaburra!: Discovering Animal Habitats Around the World


Steve Jenkins - 2005
    Learn how these animals and many others grow and thrive in very different environments.Incorporated into the book is an interactive element. Hidden in the illustrations are animals camouflaged in their surroundings. Turn the page to see if you were able to find them all!

From Caterpillar to Butterfly


Deborah Heiligman - 1996
    Soon, it disappears into a hard shell called a chrysalis. Where did it go? This is a perfect beginner's guide to the mystery of metamorphosis.Named as a NSTA/CBC Outstanding Science Trade Books for Children, this book explains the life cycle from caterpillar to butterfly with easy-to-follow prose from Deborah Heiligman and warm, colorful illustrations from Bari Weissman.This is a Stage 1 Let's-Read-and-Find-Out, which means the book explains simple science concepts for preschoolers and kindergarteners. Let's-Read-And-Find-Out is the winner of the American Association for the Advancement of Science/Subaru Science Books & Films Prize for Outstanding Science Series.Supports the Common Core Learning Standards and Next Generation Science Standards

Owls


Gail Gibbons - 2005
    But did you know there are more than 140 types of owls living in the world?Gail Gibbons' Owls celebrates the similarities and differences in the many species of owls, from large to small, living in diverse environments and making many different kinds of nests. The book covers basics of owl behavior, information on how they hunt, and the many factors that have led some types of owls to become endangered.The boldly colored illustrations feature clear labeling, and all new words are defined and reinforced with clear, simple language, appropriate for young readers. The book also features a page of intriguing owl trivia.Gail Gibbons "has taught more preschoolers and early readers about the world than any other children's writer-illustrator." Ms. Gibbons is the author of more than 100 acclaimed books for young readers, including the bestselling titles From Seed to Plant and Monarch Butterflies. Her many honors include the Washington Post/Children's Book Guild Nonfiction Award and the NSTA Outstanding Science Trade Book Award.

Ducks Don't Get Wet


Augusta R. Goldin - 1965
    It’s a fun way to learn to read and as a supplement for activity books for children.Why don't ducks get wet? Ducks dip and dive, but they stay dry because they spread oil over their feathers to make them waterproof. Learn more inside and get to know different kinds of ducks.  This is a Level One Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science title, which means the book explores more challenging concepts for children in the primary grades and supports the Common Core Learning Standards, Next Generation Science Standards, and the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) standards. Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out is the winner of the American Association for the Advancement of Science/Subaru Science Books & Films Prize for Outstanding Science Series.

Bugs A to Z


Caroline Lawton - 2011
    Simple text from A to Z provides buggy facts and figures. Larger than life full-color photographs of creepy crawlies include locusts, caterpillars, beetles, flies, grasshoppers, ants, praying mantis, and more!

Book of Bones: 10 Record-Breaking Animals


Gabrielle Balkan - 2017
    of bones! Guess whose bones are the longest, shortest, heaviest, spikiest, and more. With touchable skeletons!An International Literacy Association Teachers' Choice Title (2018)A Texas Topaz Nonfiction Reading List Title (2019)Ten record-breaking animal bones are introduced through a series of superlatives set up as a guessing game with clues. Readers examine animals' skeletons and guess to whom they belong; the answers are revealed in vibrant, full-color scenic habitats, with easily understood — and humorous — explanations. This entertaining introduction to the connection between animal bones (anatomy) and behavior is playful, relatable, and includes touch-and-feel finishes that bring the bones to life!

Owls


Laura Marsh - 2014
    Follow these curious-looking creatures through their wooded habitats, learn how owls raise their young, hunt, and protect themselves. Beautiful photos and carefully leveled text make this book perfect for reading aloud or for independent reading.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Chameleon, Chameleon


Joy Cowley - 2005
    One brave chameleon ventures from the safety of his tree in search of a new home. On his journey, he meets other rain forest animals, not all of them friendly! Alas, the new tree he chooses is already home to another chameleon. She dons her aggressive coloring until she's sure that the visitor is friend, not foe. Then they welcome each other with brilliant, happy colors.Incredible photographs and simple text perfect for young children is rounded out with informative backmatter on one of the planet's most captivating creatures.

A Chicken Followed Me Home!: Questions and Answers about a Familiar Fowl


Robin Page - 2015
    Along the way you’ll explore different breeds, discover different types of coops, and learn everything there is to know about chicken reproduction and hatching.Gorgeous, playful, and filled with facts, this engaging nonfiction picture book shines new light on a very familiar fowl!

Animals in Winter


Henrietta Bancroft - 1963
    Butterflies can't survive cold weather, so when winter comes, many butterflies fly to warmer places. They migrate. Woodchucks don't like cold weather either but they don't migrate; they hibernate. Woodchucks sleep in their dens all winter long. Read and find out how other animals cope with winter's worst weather. This is a Level One Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science title, which means the book explores more challenging concepts for children in the primary grades and supports the Common Core Learning Standards, Next Generation Science Standards, and the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) standards. Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out is the winner of the American Association for the Advancement of Science/Subaru Science Books & Films Prize for Outstanding Science Series.

Who Eats What?: Food Chains and Food Webs


Patricia Lauber - 1994
    Every link in a food chain is important because each living thing depends on others for survival, no matter how big or how small. Lively drawings from Holly Keller illustrate the clear, simple text by Patricia Lauber.This is a Stage 2 Let's-Read-and-Find-Out, which means the book explores more challenging concepts for children in the primary grades. Let's-Read-And-Find-Out is the winner of the American Association for the Advancement of Science/Subaru Science Books & Films Prize for Outstanding Science Series.Supports the Common Core Learning Standards and Next Generation Science Standards

Glow: Animals with Their Own Night-Lights


W.H. Beck - 2015
    In this fun and fascinating nonfiction picture book, join world-renowned photographers and biologists on their close encounters with the curious creatures that make their own light. Author’s note and bibliography included.

Tyrannosaurus Rex Vs. Velociraptor


Jerry Pallotta - 2010
    After I started writing the book, I found out the velociraptor is only 3 feet tall. Uh Oh! They are both nasty looking creatures.I find the skeleton of the velociraptor to be very scary.