Let the Right One In


Anne Billson - 2010
    "Twilight," "True Blood," "Being Human," "The Vampire Diaries," "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," "Blade," "Underworld," and the novels of Anne Rice and Darren Shan--against this glut of bloodsuckers, it takes an incredible film to make a name for itself. Directed by Tomas Alfredson and adapted for the screen by John Ajvide Lindqvist, The Swedish film "L't den r?tte komma in" (2008), known to American audiences as "Let the Right One In," is the most exciting, subversive, and original horror production since the genre's best-known works of the 1970s. Like "Twilight," "Let the Right One In" is a love story between a human and a vampire--but that is where the resemblance ends. Set in a snowy, surburban housing estate in 1980s Stockholm, the film combines supernatural elements with social realism. It features Oskar, a lonely, bullied child, and Eli, the girl next door. "Oskar, I'm not a girl," she tells him, and she's not kidding--she's a vampire. The two forge an intense relationship that is at once innocent and disturbing. Two outsiders against the world, one of these outsiders is, essentially, a serial killer. What does Eli want from Oskar? Simple companionship, or something else? While startlingly original, "Let the Right One In" could not have existed without the near century of vampire cinema that preceded it. Anne Billson reviews this history and the film's inheritence of (and new twists on) such classics as "Nosferatu" (1979) and "Dracula" (1931). She discusses the genre's early fliration with social realism in films such as "Martin" (1977) and "Near Dark" (1987), along with its adaptation of mythology to the modern world, and she examines the changing relationship between vampires and humans, the role of the vampire's assistant, and the enduring figure of vampires in popular culture.

Zombie Movies: The Ultimate Guide


Glenn Kay - 2008
    Romero's 2008 release Diary of the Dead this thorough, uproarious guide traces the evolution of one of horror cinema's most popular and terrifying creations. Fans will learn exactly what makes a zombie a zombie, go behind the scenes with a chilling production diary from Land of the Dead, peruse a bizarre list of the oddest things ever seen in undead cinema, and immerse themselves in a detailed rundown of the 25 greatest zombie films ever made. Containing an illustrated zombie rating system, ranging from "Highly Recommended" to "Avoid at All Costs" and "So Bad It's Good," the book also features lengthy interviews with numerous talents from in front of and behind the camera.Features chronological reviews of more than 300 zombie films.

A Pictorial History of Horror Movies


Denis Gifford - 1973
    Fully illustrated with great photographs.

Fangoria's 101 Best Horror Movies You've Never Seen: A Celebration of the World's Most Unheralded Fright Flicks


Adam Lukeman - 2003
    Working closely with Fangoria’s experts, including Editor in Chief Anthony Timpone, Adam Lukeman has compiled a must-have guide for casual horror fans and hardcore horror junkies with Fangoria’s 101 Best Horror Films You’ve Never Seen. With a brief synopsis for each of the included films, lists of cast and crew, “Terror Trivia,” and little-known facts about these lesser-known but must-see gems, Fangoria’s 101 Best Horror Films You’ve Never Seen offers a feast of gruesome information. Featured here are flicks that were dumped by their distributors or were initially flops, like Cherry Falls, Manhunter, and Pumpkinhead, foreign winners such as Cronos, The Vanishing, and Funny Games, and straight-to-video sleepers waiting to be discovered, including Shadowbuilder, Jack Be Nimble, and Nomads. There are even surprise entries directed by industry giants—movies like George A. Romero’s Day of the Dead, Brian De Palma’s Sisters, or Dario Argento’s Opera—that are frequently overshadowed by the filmmakers’ other, better-known works but are worthy of further examination. Entertaining and informative, Fangoria’s 101 Best Horror Movies You’ve Never Seen offers more than a hundred reasons to look beyond the often ho-hum Hollywood hype fests . . . when you’re really in the mood to feel your flesh crawl.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Universal Horrors: The Studio's Classic Films, 1931-1946


Tom Weaver - 2007
    Trekking boldly through haunts and horrors from The Frankenstein Monster, The Wolf Man, Count Dracula, and The Invisible Man, to The Mummy, Paula the Ape Woman, The Creeper, and The Inner Sanctum, the authors offer a definitive study of the 86 films produced during this era and present a general overview of the period. Coverage of the films includes complete cast lists, credits, storyline, behind-the-scenes information, production history, critical analysis, and commentary from the cast and crew (much of it drawn from interviews by Tom Weaver, whom USA Today calls ?the king of the monster hunters?). Unique to this edition are a new selection of photographs and poster reproductions and an appendix listing additional films of interest.

Eaten Alive!: Italian Cannibal and Zombie Movies


Jay Slater - 2002
    Jay Slater explains how the myth of the Haitian walking dead (zombies) merged with legends of third-world cannibalism to create such gruesome zombie cult films as Cannibal Holocaust, an acknowledged influence on The Blair Witch Project.

The Rough Guide to Horror Movies 1


Alan Jones - 2005
    The guide includes all the icons, from Boris Karloff to Wes Craven and Frankenstein to Freddie Kruger, including classics from Argentina, Pakistan, South Africa and the recent chillers from East Asia. The canon of fifty essential horror movies features The Cabinet of Dr Caligari and Switchblade Romance, via Psycho and The Exorcist. Everything you need to know is covered from festivals, adaptations, magazines and merchandise. The guide tells the stories behind the movies that have scared us throughout the twentieth century.

Night of the Living Dead: Behind the Scenes of the Most Terrifying Zombie Movie Ever


Joe Kane - 2010
    George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead raised the bar for onscreen violence. Moviegoers were bludgeoned with horrific scenes of zombies blood-feasting on human body parts. Nothing was taboo. A six-year-old child nibbling on her daddy's arm! Plunging a garden tool into her mother's heart! More blood spewed onscreen than ever before! And yet, people returned for more--in hordes. The zombie movie phenomenon had officially been spawned. This is the true story of the flesh-eating classic that started it all.Special Features Dozens of photos too shocking to be seen until now Stomach-churning details behind the groundbreaking FX Compelling, revealing interviews with cast and crew The legacy of Night of the Living Dead for today's horror directors

Nightmare Movies: Horror on Screen Since the 1960s


Kim Newman - 2011
    In this new edition, Kim Newman brings his seminal work completely up-to-date, both reassessing his earlier evaluations and adding a second part that assess the last two decades of horror films with all the wit, intelligence and insight for which he is known. Since the publication of the first edition, horror has been on a gradual upswing, and taken a new and stronger hold over the film industry.Newman negotiates his way through a vast back-catalogue of horror, charting the on-screen progress of our collective fears and bogeymen from the low budget slasher movies of the 60s, through to the slick releases of the 2000s, in a critical appraisal that doubles up as a genealogical study of contemporary horror and its forebears. Newman invokes the figures that fuel the ongoing demand for horror - the serial killer; the vampire; the werewolf; the zombie - and draws on his remarkable knowledge of the genre to give us a comprehensive overview of the modern myths that have shaped the imagination of multiple generations of cinema-goers.Nightmare Movies is an invaluable companion that not only provides a newly updated history of the darker side of film but a truly entertaining guide with which to discover the less well-trodden paths of horror, and re-discover the classics with a newly instructed eye.

The Slasher Movie Book


J.A. Kerswell - 2010
    Taking its cue from Hitchcock, grind-house movies, and the gory Italian giallo thrillers of the 1970s, slasher movies brought a new high in cinematic violence and suspense to mainstream cinema. For six bloody years (1978–1984) - the “golden age” of slashers - cinema screens and video stores were stalked by homicidal maniacs with murder and mayhem on their minds.The Slasher Movie Book details the subgenre’s surprising beginnings, revels in its g(l)ory days, and discusses its recent resurgence. Packed with reviews of the best (and worst) slasher movies and illustrated with an extensive collection of distinctive and often graphic color poster artwork from around the world, this book also looks at the political, cultural, and social influences on the slasher movie and its own effect on other film genres.

Horror Films of the 1970s


John Kenneth Muir - 2002
    This detailed filmography covers these and 225 more. Section One provides an introduction and a brief history of the decade. Beginning with 1970 and proceeding chronologically by year of its release in the United States, Section Two offers an entry for each film. Each entry includes several categories of information: Critical Reception (sampling both '70s and later reviews), Cast and Credits, P.O.V., (quoting a person pertinent to that film's production), Synopsis (summarizing the film's story), Commentary (analyzing the film from Muir's perspective), Legacy (noting the rank of especially worthy '70s films in the horror pantheon of decades following). Section Three contains a conclusion and these five appendices: horror film cliches of the 1970s, frequently appearing performers, memorable movie ads, recommended films that illustrate how 1970s horror films continue to impact the industry, and the 15 best genre films of the decade as chosen by Muir.

The Shining


Roger Luckhurst - 2013
    Taking the maze as a key motif, Luckhurst offers numerous threads with which to navigate the strange twists and turns along the corridors of this enigmatic film.

Dampyr #1: Devil's Son


Mauro Boselli - 2000
    But when he is summoned by soldiers who are under attack by real vampires, Harlan learns the horrible truth: his nightmares are reality

Stephen King at the Movies: A Complete History of the Film and Television Adaptations from the Master of Horror


Ian Nathan - 2019
    With 65 existing movies and 30 television shows, and many more to come, the concept of the King adaptation lies at the core of what we understand as Hollywood entertainment, the essence of horror, and the landscape of American life. Illustrated with a fabulous array of familiar and unusual iconography, this is the most comprehensive account of the films and television series adapted from the work of Stephen King ever put together. Every Children of the Corn movie has been accounted for; every remake and reboot wrestled into submission; all the dark recesses of King’s imagination brought out into the light. Including fresh critical analysis, interviews, behind-the-scenes revelations and biographical detail, this is both a King completist’s dream and a must for all movie fans. Here is the chance to delve deep into such terrifying and beloved movies and TV shows as Carrie, Salem’s Lot, The Shining, Cujo, Stand By Me, Misery, The Shawshank Redemption, The Green Mile, and such modern marvels as Castle Rock, Mr. Mercedes, Pet Sematary, It: Chapters One and Two, and Doctor Sleep.

Rebekka Franck Mystery Series: Vol 4-6


Willow Rose - 2015
     Three bone-chilling Mysteries from Best selling Author Willow Rose. - Seven, eight ... Gonna stay up late: She thought she could keep it a secret. Just fourteen years old, Amalie thought she could take off and go to the festival with her best friend without anyone knowing it - without her parents finding out. She thought she was safe when she met a man offering her drugs, she thought she was safe when she went alone to her tent to take the pills. But when she opened her eyes and found herself in the man's basement, she knew she wasn't safe anymore. She was trapped. Seven, eight ... Gonna stay up late is a Scandinavian mystery novel from the Amazon Bestselling author Willow Rose. It is the fourth book in her series about the Danish reporter Rebekka Franck. - Nine, ten ... Never sleep again: It is business as usual when Henrik Fenger picks up a girl in the bar and cheats on his wife with her in his hotel room. But, when he opens his eyes the very next morning nothing is as usual anymore. Henrik Fenger is the victim of a horrendous crime whose like has never been seen in the small kingdom of Denmark. Rebekka Franck is on her way to spend a nice relaxing week of vacation with her ex-husband Peter and her daughter Julie. They're supposed to work on their relationship and find each other as a family again, but soon Rebekka is pulled away for work when she is called in to cover the case for the newspaper along with her photographer and former boyfriend Sune Johansen. Nine, Ten ... Never sleep again is the fifth installment in Willow Rose's popular Rebekka Franck-series. - Eleven, twelve ... Dig and delve: Everybody hates Mondays. This Monday is particularly bad for the residents on Blegevej in the Northern part of Denmark. Just before eight o'clock Monday morning, the entire neighborhood sinks into the ground in a matter of seconds when a giant sinkhole opens up underneath it. Rebekka Franck is visiting a dear friend when she is swallowed up by the hole and ends up trapped inside a limestone mine. Together with the surviving residents from the neighborhood, she tries to get by underground while waiting to be rescued. When the body of one of the survivors turns up inside the mines, they suddenly know that not only do they face starvation and thirst, they also have a killer among them. Eleven, Twelve...Dig and Delve is the sixth book in Willow Rose's internationally bestselling series about the Danish reporter Rebekka Franck. It's followed by Thirteen, Fourteen ... Little boy unseeen Scroll up and grab a copy today.