High Tide for Horseshoe Crabs


Lisa Kahn Schnell - 2015
    Dual-layered text introduces the life cycle of the horseshoe crab, with a focus on the annual mass-spawning event at Delaware Bay.

What Do You Do With a Tail Like This?


Steve Jenkins - 2003
    Readers can explore the many amazing things animals can do with their ears, eyes, mouths, noses, feet, and tails in this beautifully illustrated interactive guessing book.

Born in the Wild: Baby Mammals and Their Parents


Lita Judge - 2014
    Filled with illustrations of some of the most adorable babies in the kingdom, this awww-inspiring book looks at the traits that all baby mammals share and proves that, even though they're born in the wild, they're not so very different from us, after all!

Once Upon a Jungle


Laura Knowles - 2017
    Step inside the wild and colourful jungle with this striking and richly illustrated book that introduces the food chain concept through simple, poetic language. Learn how the circle of life allows the jungle ecosystem to flourish, and see how many animals you can spot hiding in the leaves along the way.

I, Fly: The Buzz About Flies and How Awesome They Are


Bridget Heos - 2015
    Flies are so much cooler! They flap their wings 200 times a second, compared to a butterfly's measly five to twelve times. Their babies—maggots—are much cuter than caterpillars (obviously). And when they eat solid food, they even throw up on it to turn it into a liquid. Who wouldn't want to study an insect like that?In an unforgettably fun, fact-filled presentation, this lovable (and highly partisan) narrator promotes his species to a sometimes engrossed, sometimes grossed-out, class of kids.

Book of Bones: 10 Record-Breaking Animals


Gabrielle Balkan - 2017
    of bones! Guess whose bones are the longest, shortest, heaviest, spikiest, and more. With touchable skeletons!An International Literacy Association Teachers' Choice Title (2018)A Texas Topaz Nonfiction Reading List Title (2019)Ten record-breaking animal bones are introduced through a series of superlatives set up as a guessing game with clues. Readers examine animals' skeletons and guess to whom they belong; the answers are revealed in vibrant, full-color scenic habitats, with easily understood — and humorous — explanations. This entertaining introduction to the connection between animal bones (anatomy) and behavior is playful, relatable, and includes touch-and-feel finishes that bring the bones to life!

The Spider


Elise Gravel - 2015
    It covers such topics as the spider's habitats (pretty much everywhere but outer space), the silk it spins (it can trap prey and makes a nifty bowtie), and its parenting practice (female spiders carry around their eggs in a silk purse). Although silly and off-the-wall, The Spider contains real information that will both amuse and teach.

Winter Sleep: A Hibernation Story


Sean Taylor - 2019
    Spot the sleeping animals as the tale unfolds, then learn about their hibernation habits from the information pages at the end. Co-authors Sean Taylor (picture book author) and Alex Morss (ecologist, journalist, and educator) offer a gentle introduction to the concept of hibernation. In the frosty, quiet forest, the snow blankets the ground and the trees have shed their leaves. Where have all the animals gone? Are they asleep too? In each cutaway scene, see what the child cannot—that underground below his feet are dens with sleeping creatures, and within the hollow trunks of trees, animals are nesting. After the story, annotated illustrations explain the hibernation facts for each animal and what they will do when they wake up for spring. Cozy up as you expand you and your child's knowledge of the natural world.

1001 Things To Spot In The Sea


Katie Daynes - 2003
    Simple text and colourful scenes bursting with things to spot combine to help children develop skills in reading, counting, matching and identification.

Can an Aardvark Bark?


Melissa Stewart - 2017
    Lots of other animals grunt too… Barks, grunts, squeals—animals make all kinds of sounds to communicate and express themselves. With a growling salamander and a whining porcupine, bellowing giraffes and laughing gorillas, this boisterous book is chock-full of fun and interesting facts and is sure to be a favorite of even the youngest animal enthusiasts.

Bugs A to Z


Caroline Lawton - 2011
    Simple text from A to Z provides buggy facts and figures. Larger than life full-color photographs of creepy crawlies include locusts, caterpillars, beetles, flies, grasshoppers, ants, praying mantis, and more!

Snack, Snooze, Skedaddle


Laura Purdie Salas - 2019
    Some, such as mice, foxes, and moose, simply tolerate the cold. Of course black bears hibernate, but chipmunks, wood frogs, and garter snakes do too. And then there are the creatures that migrate, including hummingbirds, blue whales, and even earthworms! This rhyming nonfiction picture book by Laura Purdie Salas tells you all about how animals survive chilly weather.

Eat Your Rocks, Croc!: Dr. Glider's Advice for Troubled Animals


Jess Keating - 2020
    Sugar Glider to help!Help me, Dr. Glider. My stomach is killing me! I eat all the same food as my family, but I'm the only one that feels sick. What's wrong with me?Dr. Sugar Glider travels around the world to help animals (and, on occasion, plants!) with all sorts of problems. Whether it's a crocodile with a sick stomach, a creeped-out krill, a stressed meerkat, or a male praying mantis trying to date, Dr. Glider is ready to offer advice!

Out on the Prairie


Donna M. Bateman - 2012
    Learn about the animals that inhabit this semiarid environment where baby critters and their mothers wallow, run, call, bark, hop, scurry, nod, slither, howl, and jump all day long and all through the night.Count animals from one to ten in the rhyming text modeled after the traditional song "Over in the Meadow" by Olive A. Wadsworth. A guide to prairie flora and fauna is included.

Behold the Beautiful Dung Beetle


Cheryl Bardoe - 2014
    When an animal lightens its load, dung beetles race to the scene. They battle over, devour, hoard, and lay their eggs in the precious poop. Dung is food, drink, and fuel for new life—as crucial to these beetles as the beetles are to many habitats, including our own.