Audrey Hepburn: Fair Lady of the Screen


Ian Woodward - 1984
    Ranked number 50 in Empire Magazine's 'Top 100 Movie Stars of All Time', her appeal as a screen icon is set to last for years to come.From her roles in such legendary films as Breakfast at Tiffany's and her Oscar-winning performance in Roman Holiday, to her lovers and the pain of losing a child, this revealing biography is essential reading for Hepburn and film fans alike.

Becoming Lola


Harriet Steel - 2010
    It brings to vibrant life the true story of Eliza Gilbert, the daughter of an obscure Ensign in the British Army and his cold Irish wife. When she grew up, Eliza changed her name to Lola Montez. She was a dancer, a courtesan, a bigamist, the mistress of a king and the nineteenth-century’s most notorious adventuress. Blazing like a female firecracker across the stages and courts of Europe and beyond, she was, for a while, second only to Queen Victoria in fame.

The Complete Helen Forrester 4-Book Memoir: Twopence to Cross the Mersey / Liverpool Miss / By the Waters of Liverpool / Lime Street at Two


Helen Forrester - 1990
    672p hardback, a fresh copy, clean, firm binding, dustjacket in excellent condition, like new, signed by the author

Noon at Tiffany's


Echo Heron - 2012
    For the next 21 years, her pivotal role in his multi-million dollar empire remained one of Tiffany's most closely guarded secrets--a secret that when revealed 118 years later sent the international art world into a tailspin.Torn between his obsession with Clara and his lust for success, Tiffany resorts to desperate measures to keep her creative genius under his command. Clara cleverly navigates both her turbulent relationship with Tiffany and the rigid rules of Victorian and Edwardian societies, in order to embrace all the adventure and romance turn-of-the-century New York City has to offer.Basing her story on a recently discovered cache of letters written between 1888 and 1944, New York Times bestselling author Echo Heron artfully blends fact with fiction to draw the reader into the remarkable life of one of America's most prolific and extraordinary women artists: Clara Wolcott Driscoll, the hidden genius behind the iconic Tiffany lamps.

The Real Elizabeth: An Intimate Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II


Andrew Marr - 2011
    In public, she confines herself to optimistic pieties and guarded smiles; in private, she is wry, funny, and an excellent mimic. Now, for the first time, one of Britain's leading journalists and historians gets behind the mask and tells us the fascinating story of the real Elizabeth.Born shortly before the Depression, Elizabeth grew up during World War II and became queen because of the shocking abdication of her uncle and the early death of her father. Only twenty-five when she ascended to the throne, she has been at the apex of the British state for nearly six decades. She has entertained and known numerous world leaders, including every U.S. president since Harry Truman. Brought up to regard family values as sacred, she has seen all but one of her children divorce; her heir, Prince Charles, conduct an adulterous affair before Princess Diana's death; and a steady stream of family secrets poured into the open. Yet she has never failed to carry out her duties, and she has never said a word about any of the troubles she has endured.Andrew Marr, who enjoys extraordinary access to senior figures at Buckingham Palace, has written a revealing and essential book about a woman who has managed to remain private to the point of mystery throughout her reign.

Angels along the Way


Della Reese - 1997
    In this upbeat, joyful book, Della Reese leaves readers with a belief in the human angels who step in, providing guidance and support. of photos.

John F. Kennedy’s Women: The Story of a Sexual Obsession


Michael O'Brien - 2011
    Kennedy has been more carefully scrutinized. Michael O’Brien, who knows as much about Kennedy as any historian now writing, here takes a comprehensive look at the feature of Camelot that remained largely under the radar during the White House years: Kennedy’s womanizing. Indeed, O’Brien writes, Kennedy’s approach to women and sex was near pathological, beyond the farthest reaches of the media’s imagination at the time. The record makes for an astonishing piece of presidential history.---Michael O’Brien was born in Green Bay, Wisconsin, and studied at the University of Notre Dame and the University of Wisconsin at Madison, where he received a Ph.D. in history. He is the author of the widely praised John F. Kennedy: A Biography, a full-scale study based on eleven years’ research into letters, diaries, financial papers, medical records, manuscripts, and oral histories; and a concise analytical life of the president, Rethinking Kennedy. He is now emeritus professor of history at the University of Wisconsin, Fox Valley, and lives in Door County, Wisconsin.

Amidst the Shadows of Trees: A Holocaust Child’s Survival in the Partisans


Miriam M. Brysk - 2007
    They announce that the logical and important places to begin to examine that history are eye witnesses. Miriam Brysk’s chronicle is among the more exceptional of these works. It reflects her own life: highly accomplished, intelligent, detailed and thoughtful. At age seven, Miriam, her mother Bronka and father, Chaim Miasnik, a renowned surgeon, escaped the Lida ghetto and joined Jewish partisans in the Lipiczany Forest. Before the end of the war, Miriam estimates that her father had saved hundreds of lives and helped build and supervise a partisan hospital in the swamps of the forest. Constantly hunted by German soldiers, she experienced childhood terror that has remained with her. She lost her innocence, her childhood, her youth as she clung to her mother and her prized possession, a pistol. Her head was shaved so she would look like a boy. Her memory of the details of that time—both in the Lida ghetto and in the forest—remains remarkably sharp and distinguishes this memoir from many others. — Sidney Bolkosky, William E. Stirton Professor in the Social Sciences, Professor of History, University of Michigan-Dearborn

Sean Penn: His Life and Times


Richard T. Kelly - 2004
    Throughout his remarkable career in the dramatic arts, as well as his occasionally explosive personal life, Sean Penn has proved he rarely plays by the rules. A tumultuous marriage to Madonna, stints in jail, and other forms of hell-raising marked Penn's younger years, along with some stunning performances on film. Later, Penn emerged as a brilliant director, devoted father, contentious political activist…and reluctant actor, capable nevertheless of breathtaking performances (Dead Man Walking, Sweet and Lowdown, Mystic River, and 21 Grams). Illustrated with over seventy-five black and white photographs and drawing on exclusive interviews with Penn and his family, friends and colleagues (Jack Nicholson, Dennis Hopper, Woody Allen, Susan Sarandon, Bono, Christopher Walken, Angelica Huston, and many more), Kelly creates an engaging, richly detailed and multi-faceted portrait of an uncompromising American artist in this exclusive and engrossing authorized biography.

High Hopes (The Hopkins Family Saga, Book 4): An irresistible tale of northern life in the 1940s


Billy Hopkins - 2000
    Despite his dad's gloomy warnings that he'll pick up bad ways from the toffs down South, Billy survives two years in the Big City, and returns to take up his first teaching job in Manchester - on �300 a year! The catch is his first class, Senior Four, who bitterly resent the raising of the school leaving age, and are all set to take it out on their teacher - luckily the kid from Collyhurst has some tricks up his sleeve. And Billy's about to fall in love with the beautiful Laura. But is she, as his dad says, 'too good for the likes of us'?

In First Person: A Breath Taking Personal Memoir (Holocaust Survivor Autobiography)


Lucy Paz - 2017
    But then black clouds gathered on the horizonas war loomed ahead.People began to hoard food, military-aged men disappeared from the streets, and long linesformed at stores. It was Alice’s first war in Israel, and the situation was grave. The personal horror story of Alice’s first war comes back to haunt her Alice was beside herself; the ground felt unsteady under her feet. Was it possible that what had happened then is going to happen again? Alice was born when World War II was raging. Her father joined the army and never returned. When the Nazis started transporting Jews to ghettos and death camps, her mother wanted to save her. So she gave her away. Will Alice be mercilessly thrown back into the appalling experiences of her past? Alice never knew her parents. They are faceless to her; she can’t see or imagine them. Was this war now happening so that Alice would finally be able to feel like her mother when she gave her child away? Scroll up now to get your copy of In First Person!

Are You Morbid?


Thomas Gabriel Fischer - 2000
    This book is Celtic Frost's official history written by the front-man, Thomas Gabriel Fischer, who describes his story as full of facts and anecdotes, some unflattering, many trashy, some embarassing, many senselessly funny but all putting right the band's reported notoriety.

Jay's Journal of Anomalies


Ricky Jay - 2001
    This excursion into the history of bizarre entertainments includes armless calligraphers, mathematical dogs, tightrope-walking fleas and assorted quacks, flimflammers and charlatans of spectacle.

The Diary of Anne Frank


Brad Stradley - 2010
    This is meant to make the text more accessible for older students who the previous easy readers would find too childish. The content has not been altered, just the reading level. The reading level is around 2nd to 3rd grade.

Mozart's Women: His Family, His Friends, His Music


Jane Glover - 2005
    But, first and last, Mozart loved and respected women. His mother, his sister, his wife, her sisters, and his female patrons, friends, lovers and fellow artists all figure prominently in his life. And his experience, observation and understanding of women reappear, spectacularly, in the characters he created. As one of our finest interpreters of Mozart's work, Jane Glover is perfectly placed to bring these remarkable women -- both real and dramatized -- vividly to life. We meet Mozart's mother, Maria Anna, and his beloved and devoted sister, Nannerl, perhaps as talented as her brilliant brother but, owing to her sex, destined to languish at home while Wolfgang and their father entertained the drawing rooms of Europe. We meet, too, Mozart's "other family" -- his in-laws, the Webers: Constanze, his wife, much maligned by history, and her sisters, Aloysia, Sophie and Josefa. Aloysia and Josefa were highly talented singers for whom Mozart wrote some of his most remarkable music. Aloysia was the first woman whom Mozart truly and passionately loved, and her eventual rejection of him nearly broke his heart. Constanze, though a less gifted singer, proved a steadfast and loving wife and -- after Mozart's death -- his extremely efficient widow, consolidating his reputation and ensuring that his most enduring legacy, his music, never be forgotten.Mozart's Women is their story. But it is also the story of the women in his operas, all of whom were -- like his sister, his mother, his wife and his entire female acquaintance -- restrained by the conventions and strictures of eighteenth-century society. Yet through his glorious writing, he identified and released the emotions of his characters. Constanze in Die Entführung aus dem Serail; Ilia and Elettra in Idomeneo; Susanna and the Countess in Le nozze di Figaro; Donnas Anna and Elvira in Don Giovanni; Fiordiligi, Dorabella and Despina in Così fan tutte; Pamina and the Queen of the Night in Die Zauberflöte: are all examined and celebrated. They hold up the mirror to their audiences and offer inestimable insight, together constituting yet further proof of Mozart's true genius and phenomenal understanding of human nature. Rich, evocative and compellingly readable, Mozart's Women illuminates the music and the man -- but, above all, the women who inspired him.