Home Now: How 6000 Refugees Transformed an American Town


Cynthia Anderson - 2019
    But then the story unexpectedly veered: over the course of fifteen years, the city became home to thousands of African immigrants and, along the way, turned into one of the most Muslim towns in the US. Now about 6,000 of Lewiston's 36,000 inhabitants are refugees and asylum seekers, many of them Somali. Cynthia Anderson tells the story of this fractious yet resilient city near where she grew up, offering the unfolding drama of a community's reinvention--and humanizing some of the defining political issues in America today. In Lewiston, progress is real but precarious. Anderson takes the reader deep into the lives of both immigrants and lifelong Mainers: a single Muslim mom, an anti-Islamist activist, a Congolese asylum seeker, a Somali community leader. Their lives unfold in these pages as anti-immigrant sentiment rises across the US and national realities collide with those in Lewiston. Home Now gives a poignant account of America's evolving relationship with religion and race, and makes a sensitive yet powerful case for embracing change.

We Need To Talk About The British Empire


Afua Hirsch
    through the stories of people who lived through it....

Destruction of Black Civilization: Great Issues of a Race From 4500 B.C. To 2000 A.D.


Chancellor Williams - 1971
    A widely read classic exposition of the history of Africans on the continent—and the people of African descent in the United States and in the diaspora—this well researched analysis details the development of civiliza

Making Malcolm: The Myth And Meaning Of Malcolm X


Michael Eric Dyson - 1995
    The nineties are marked by intense and often angry debates about racial authenticity and "selling out," and the participants in these debates--from politicians to filmmakers to rap artists--often draw on Malcolm's scorching rebukes to such moves. Meanwhile, Malcolm's "X" is marketed in countless business endeavors and is stylishly branded on baseball hats and T-shirts sported by every age, race, and gender. But this rampant commercialization is only a small part of Malcolm's remarkable renaissance. One of the century's most complex black leaders, he is currently blazing a new path across contemporary popular culture, and has even seared the edges of an academy that once froze him out. Thirty years after his assassination, what is it about his life and words that speaks so powerfully to so many? In Making Malcolm, Michael Eric Dyson probes the myths and meanings of Malcolm X for our time. From Spike Lee's film biography to Eugene Wolfenstein's psychobiographical study, from hip-hop culture to gender and racial politics, Dyson cuts a critical swathe through both the idolization and the vicious caricatures that have undermined appreciation of Malcolm's greatest accomplishments. The book's first section offers a boldly original and penetrating analysis of the major trends in interpreting Malcolm's legacy since his death, and the fiercely competing interests and ideologies that have shaped these trends. From mainstream books to writings published by the independent black press, Dyson identifies and examines the different "Malcolms" who have emerged in popular and academic investigations of his life and career. With impassioned and compelling force, Dyson argues that Malcolm was too formidable a historic figure--the movements he led too variable and contradictory, the passion and intelligence he summoned too extraordinary and disconcerting--to be viewed through any narrow cultural prism. The second half of the book offers a fascinating exploration of Malcolm's relationship to a resurgent black nationalism, his influence on contemporary black filmmakers and musicians, and his use in progressive black politics. From sexism and gangsta rap to the painful predicament of black males, from the politics of black nationalism to the possibilities of race in the Age of Clinton, Dyson's trenchant and often inspiring analysis reveals how Malcolm's legacy continues to spur debate and action today. A rare and important book, Making Malcolm casts new light not only on the life and career of a seminal black leader, but on the aspirations and passions of the growing numbers who have seized on his life for insight and inspiration.

African Experience: From "Lucy" to Mandela


Kenneth P. Vickery - 2006
    Finding the "Lost Continent" 2. Africa's Many Natural Environments 3. A Virtual Tour of the Great Land 4. The Cradle of Humankind 5. Crops, Cattle, Iron-Taming a Continent 6. Kinship and Community-Societies Take Shape 7. Like Nothing Else-The Ancient Nile Valley 8. Soul and Spirit-Religion in Africa 9. Ethiopia-Outpost of Christianity 10. West Africa's "Golden Age" 11. The Swahili Commercial World 12. Great Zimbabwe and the Cities of the South 13. The Atlantic Slave Trade-The Scope 14. The Atlantic Slave Trade-The Impact 15. South Africa-The Dutch Cape Colony 16. South Africa-The Zulu Kingdom 17. South Africa-The Frontier and Unification 18. South Africa-Diamonds and Gold 19. Prelude to the "Scramble for Africa" 20. European Conquest and African Resistance 21. Colonial Africa-New Realities 22. Colonial Africa-Comparisons and Change 23. The Lion Awakens-The Rise of Nationalism 24. The Peaceful Paths to Independence 25. The Congo-Promise and Pain 26. Segregation to Apartheid in South Africa 27. The Armed Struggles for Independence 28. The First Taste of Freedom 29. The Taste Turns Sour 30. The World Turns Down-The "Permanent Crisis" 31. A New Dawn? The Democratic Revival 32. The South African Miracle 33. The Unthinkable-The Rwanda Genocide 34. The New Plague-HIV/AIDS in Africa 35. Zimbabwe-Background to Contemporary Crisis 36. Africa Found

Race And Culture: A World View


Thomas Sowell - 1995
    Encompassing more than a decade of research around the globe, this book shows that cultural capital has far more impact than politics, prejudice, or genetics on the social and economic fates of minorities, nations, and civilization.

American Slavery: History in an Hour


Kat Smutz - 2011
    An important and dark time in Black—and American—history, the era of American slavery is explored in American Slavery in an Hour, which will explain the key facts and give you a clear overview of this much discussed period of history, as well as its legacy in modern America.

A People's History of the United States: Highlights from the Twentieth Century


Howard Zinn - 2003
    Here we learn that many of our country's greatest battles -- labor laws, women's rights, racial equality -- were carried out at the grassroots level, against steel-willed resistance. This edition of A People's History of the United States features insightful analysis of some of the most important events in this country in the past one hundred years.Featuring a preface and afterword read by the author himself, this audio continues Howard Zinn's important contribution to a complete and balanced understanding of American history.

Olympic Pride, American Prejudice: The Untold Story of 18 African Americans Who Defied Jim Crow and Adolf Hitler to Compete in the 1936 Berlin Olympics


Deborah Riley Draper - 2018
    After all, they were representing a country that considered them second-class citizens and would compete in a country amidst a strong undercurrent of Aryan superiority and anti-Semitism.Jesse Owens is the most recognized of the group for winning four gold medals at the Berlin Olympics. Other winners include Jackie Robinson’s brother Mack who won silver for the 200-meter race, and Cornelius Johnson, who led an American sweep in the high jump.As a companion piece to the brilliant documentary Olympic Pride, American Prejudice this book draws on over forty hours of interviews and extensive research the filmmakers obtained which did not make the final film cut. It explores key elements of the story and provides fuller context on the prospect of an Olympic boycott, the relationships between the president of the International Olympic Committee and the Nazis, the different perspectives of Jewish athletes, the NAACP and black newspapers, and details about the actual lives of the eighteen Olympians from family members’ testimonials.Capturing a powerful and untold piece of history, The Black Auxiliary is also a celebration of the courage, commitment, and accomplishments of these talented athletes.

My Face Is Black Is True: Callie House and the Struggle for Ex-Slave Reparations


Mary Frances Berry - 2005
    Mary Frances Berry resurrects the remarkable story of ex-slave Callie House (1861-1928) who, seventy years before the civil-rights movement, headed a demand for ex-slave reparations. A widowed Nashville washerwoman and mother of five, House went on to fight for African American pensions based on those offered to Union soldiers, brilliantly targeting $68 million in taxes on seized rebel cotton and demanding it as repayment for centuries of unpaid labor. Here is the fascinating story of a forgotten civil rights crusader: a woman who emerges as a courageous pioneering activist, a forerunner of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr.

The 10 Big Lies about America


Michael Medved - 2008
    "It's the things we know that just ain't so." In this bold and brilliantly argued book, acclaimed author and talk-radio host Michael Medved zeroes in on ten of the biggest fallacies that millions of Americans believe about our country--in spite of incontrovertible facts to the contrary. In "The 10 Big Lies About America," Medved pinpoints the most pernicious pieces of America-bashing disinformation that pollute current debates about the economy, race, religion in politics, the Iraq war, and other contentious issues. The myths that Medved deftly debunks include: Myth: The United States is uniquely guilty for the crime of slavery and based its wealth on stolen African labor. Fact: The colonies that became the United States accounted for, at most, 3 percent of the abominable international slave trade; the persistence of slavery in America slowed economic progress; and the U.S. deserves unique credit for ending slavery. Myth: The alarming rise of big business hurts the United States and oppresses its people. Fact: Corporations played an indispensable role in building America, and corporate growth has brought progress that benefits all with cheaper goods and better jobs. Myth: The Founders intended a secular, not Christian, nation. Fact: Even after ratifying the Constitution, fully half the state governments endorsed specific Chris-tian denominations. And just a day after approving the First Amendment, forbidding the establishment of religion, Congress called for a national "day of public thanksgiving and prayer" to acknowledge "the many signal favors of Almighty God." Myth: A war on the middle class means less comfort and opportunity for the average American. Fact: Familiar campaign rhetoric about the victimized middle class ignores the overwhelming statistical evidence that the standard of living keeps rising for every segment of the population, as well as the real-life experience of tens of millions of middle-class Americans. Each of the ten lies--widely believed among elites and taught as truth in universities and public schools--is a grotesque, propagandistic distortion of the historical record. For everyone who is tired of hearing America denigrated by people who don't know what they're talking about, "The 10 Big Lies About America "supplies the ammunition necessary to fire back the next time somebody tries to recycle these baseless beliefs. Medved's witty, well-documented rebuttal is a refreshing reminder that as Americans we should feel blessed, not burdened, by our heritage.

Young Mandela: The Revolutionary Years


David James Smith - 2010
    He is fixed in the public mind as the world's elder statesman -- the gray-haired man with a kindly smile who spent 27 years in prison before becoming the first black president in South Africa. But Nelson Mandela was not always elderly or benign. And, in Young Mandela, award-winning journalist and author David James Smith takes us deep into the heart of racist South Africa to paint a portrait of the Mandela that many have forgotten: the committed revolutionary who left his family behind to live on the run, adopting false names and disguises and organizing the first strikes to overthrow the apartheid state. Young Mandela lifts the curtain on an icon's first steps to greatness.

The Death of the West: How Dying Populations and Immigrant Invasions Imperil Our Country and Civilization


Patrick J. Buchanan - 2000
    Collapsing birth rates in Europe and the U. S., coupled with population explosions in Africa, Asia and Latin America are set to cause cataclysmic shifts in world power, as unchecked immigration swamps and polarizes every Western society and nation.The Death of the West details how a civilization, culture, and moral order are passing away and foresees a new world order that has terrifying implications for our freedom, our faith, and the preeminence of American democracy.The Death of the West is a timely, provocative study that asks the question that quietly troubles millions: Is the America we grew up in gone forever?

African Origins of the Major "Western Religions"


Yosef A.A. Ben-Jochannan - 1991
    Ben's most thought-provoking works. This critical examination of the history, beliefs and myths, remains instructive and fresh. By highlighting the African influences and roots of these religions, Dr. Ben reveals an untold history that is completely unknown, Dr. Ben says covered up by the White race, by the rest of the world.

Black Indians: A Hidden Heritage


William Loren Katz - 1986
    Using fascinating biographies and detailed research, Katz creates a chronology of this hidden heritage during the settlement of the American West. Illustrations. Young Adult.