Aboriginal Australians


Richard Broome - 2002
    Fully updated, this new edition explains the land rights struggle since Mabo, the Hindmarsh Island case, and debates over the stolen generation.

Images and Symbols: Studies in Religious Symbolism


Mircea Eliade - 1952
    He describes and analyzes some of the most powerful and ubiquitous symbols that have ruled the mythological thinking of East and West in many times and at many levels of cultural development.

Wilder Mann: The Image of the Savage


Charles Fréger - 2012
    People literally put themselves into the skin of the "savage," in masquerades that stretch back centuries. By becoming a bear, a goat, a stag, a wild boar, a man of straw, a devil, or a monster with jaws of steel, these people celebrate the cycle of life and seasons. The costumes amaze with their extraordinary diversity and prodigious beauty. Work on this project took leading French photographer Charles Fréger to eighteen European countries in search of the mythological figure of the Wild Man.

The Ghost and the Bounty Hunter: William Buckley, John Batman and the Theft of Kulin Country


Adam Courtenay - 2020
    A few months later, the local Aboriginal people found the six-foot-five former soldier near death. Believing he was a lost kinsman returned from the dead, they took him in, and for thirty-two years Buckley lived as a Wadawurrung man, learning his adopted tribe's language, skills and methods to survive.The outside world finally caught up with Buckley in 1835, after John Batman, a bounty hunter from Van Diemen's Land, arrived in the area, seeking to acquire and control the perfect pastureland around the bay. What happened next saw the Wadawurrung betrayed and Buckley eventually broken. The theft of Kulin country would end in the birth of a city. The frontier wars had begun.By the bestselling author of The Ship That Never Was, The Ghost and the Bounty Hunter is a fascinating and poignant true story from Australian colonial history.

A Shorter History Of Australia


Geoffrey Blainey - 1994
    After a lifetime of research and debate on Australian and international history, Geoffrey Blainey is well-placed to introduce us to the people who have played a part and to guide us through the events which have created the Australian identityweaving in and out, again and again, over 50,000 years.

Maya Cosmos


David A. Freidel - 1993
    A Masterful blend of archaeology, anthropology, astronomy, and lively personal reportage, Maya Comos tells a constellation of stories, from the historical to the mythological, and envokes the awesome power of one of the richest civilizations ever to grace the earth.

Islands Of Angry Ghosts


Hugh Edwards - 1991
    The Batavia expedition: Australian divers uncover a grim tale of shipwreck, mutiny and massacre.

Memphis 68: The Tragedy of Southern Soul


Stuart Cosgrove - 2017
    It was a deeply segregated city, ill at ease with the modern world and yet to adjust to the era of civil rights and racial integration. Stax Records offered an escape from the turmoil of the real world for many soul and blues musicians, with much of the music created there becoming the soundtrack to the civil rights movements.The book opens with the death of the city's most famous recording artist, Otis Redding, who died in a plane crash in the final days of 1967, and then follows the fortunes of Redding's label, Stax/Volt Records, as its fortunes fall and rise again. But, as the tense year unfolds, the city dominates world headlines for the worst of reasons: the assassination of civil rights leader Martin Luther King.

Play It Loud: An Epic History of the Style, Sound, and Revolution of the Electric Guitar


Alan di Perna - 2016
    This is a story of inventors and iconoclasts, of scam artists, prodigies and mythologizers, as varied and original as the music they spawned. Play It Loud uses twelve landmark instruments, each of them a milestone in the progress of the electric guitar, to illustrate the chaos, conflict and passion it has inspired. It introduces Leo Fender, a man who couldn't play a note, but whose innovation helped transform the classical guitar into the explosive sound machine it is today. Some of the most significant social movements of the 20th century are indebted to the guitar: it was an essential part of Beatlemania and Woodstock; a mirror to the rise of the teenager as a social force; a linchpin of the punk movement's sound and ethos. And today the guitar has come full circle, with contemporary titans such as Jack White of The White Stripes and Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys bringing some of those earliest electric guitar forms back to the limelight.     For generations, the electric guitar has been an international symbol of freedom, danger and hedonism. Play It Loud is the story of how a band of innovators transformed a simple notion into a singular cultural force.

Northwest Coast Indian Art: An Analysis of Form


Bill Holm - 1965
    The painted and carved wooden screens, chests and boxes, rattles, crest hats, and other artworks display the complex and sophisticated northern Northwest Coast style of art that is the visual language used to illustrate inherited crests and tell family stories.In the 1950s Bill Holm, a graduate student of Dr. Erna Gunther, former Director of the Burke Museum, began a systematic study of northern Northwest Coast art. In 1965, after studying hundreds of bentwood boxes and chests, he published "Northwest Coast Indian Art: An Analysis of Form." This book is a foundational reference on northern Northwest Coast Native art. Through his careful studies, Bill Holm described this visual language using new terminology that has become part of the established vocabulary that allows us to talk about works like these and understand changes in style both through time and between individual artists' styles. Holm examines how these pieces, although varied in origin, material, size, and purpose, are related to a surprising degree in the organization and form of their two-dimensional surface decoration.The author presents an incisive analysis of the use of color, line, and texture; the organization of space; and such typical forms as ovoids, eyelids, U forms, and hands and feet. The evidence upon which he bases his conclusions constitutes a repository of valuable information for all succeeding researchers in the field

Planet Drum: A Celebration Of Percussion And Rhythm


Mickey Hart - 1991
    It is a stunning pictorial map of the World Beat and a dazzling companion to "Drumming at the Edge of Magic." The wisdom of thinkers such as Tsao-Tzu and Joseph Campbell mingle with the recorded thoughts of a Siberian villager and a Cheyenne shaman to provide a fascinating accompaniment.

Mailman of the Birdsville Track: The Story of Tom Kruse


Kristin Weidenbach - 2003
    He made the run every fortnight and was a lifeline to the isolated settlements and stations along the way, delivering everything from letters to essential supplies.

The Samurai Sword: A Handbook a Handbook


John M. Yumoto - 1979
    It has been said to be the embodiment of the samurai's code, the expression of his steel discipline, unswerving devotion, and peerless skill. It is, in addition, one of the most outstanding examples of Japan's tradition of highly skilled craftsmanship. The product of the tireless efforts of hereditary artisans, whose sole purpose in life was the achievement of perfection in their craft, the samurai sword is indeed a beautiful work of art as well as a formidable weapon. In the opinion of informed critics, both the workmanship and quality of the Japanese sword far surpass that of the Western Damascus and Toledo blades of folklore fame.

Charles Kingsford Smith And Those Magnificent Men


Peter FitzSimons - 2009
    In an era in which aviators were superstars, Smithy was among the greatest and, throughout his amazing career, his fame in Australia was matched only by that of Don Bradman. Among other achievements, Smithy was the first person to fly across the Pacific, he broke the record for the fastest flight from England to Australia, and at one point he held more long-distance flying records than anyone else on the planet. If that wasn't enough, Smithy was also a war hero, receiving the Military Cross for gallantry in action after being shot - and losing three toes - during one of many flying missions during World War I. Smithy was not the lone adventurer of the skies. Early aviation drew to it a company of daredevils who all challenged gravity and fear.This comprehensive biography, written with typical flair by bestselling author Peter FitzSimons, covers the triumphs and tragedies of not only Kingsford Smith's daring and controversial life but also those of his companion aviators.

1787: The Lost Chapters of Australia's Beginnings


Nick Brodie - 2016
    The time before the First Fleet is usually treated as a preface to the main story, a brief interlude that starts 50,000 years before the present and ends as sails are seen on an eastern horizon. But in 1787 the peoples of Australia were not simply living in a timeless ‘Dreamtime’, following the seasons, and waiting for colonisation by Britain in 1788.In 1787, Nick Brodie uses the sailors, writers, scientists, and other visitors to our shores to reassess neglected chapters of Australia’s early history, and place Australia and its peoples into the great story of human history. He turns the narratives of ‘exploration’ and ‘discovery’ around to take a closer look at the Indigenous peoples, the broader regional scene, and what these encounters collectively tell. 1787 does not stand for a year—it stands for an idea. This is the sweeping story of Greater Australasia and its peoples, a long-overdue challenge to the myth that Australia’s story started in 1788.Dr Nick Brodie is an historian, archaeologist, and writer. Nick’s previous book Kin was published to critical acclaim in 2015.