Running Through Corridors, Volume 1: The 60s - Rob and Toby's Marathon Watch of Doctor Who


Robert Shearman - 2010
    In Running Through Corridors, two Doctor Who lovers of old - Robert Shearman and Toby Hadoke - embark on an epic quest of friendship: spend the gap year of 2009 (when Doctor Who consisted of a handful of specials rather than a full season) re-watching the whole of Who two episodes a day, every day, from the show's start in 1963 and ending with David Tennant's swan song on New Year's, 2010.This three-volume series contains Shearman and Hadoke's diary of that experience - a grand opus of their wry observations about the show, their desire to see the good in every story, and their chronicle of the real-life changes to Who in that year.With this book, Who fans will feel that they're watching along with Shearman (World Fantasy Award winner, Hugo Award nominee and writer on the new Doctor Who) and Hadoke (renowned stage performer for his one-man comedy show, Moths Ate My Doctor Who Scarf) as they make their grand journey through the world's most wonderful and longest-running drama series.

The Discontinuity Guide


Paul Cornell - 1995
    This is an essential reference for fans and a hilarious introduction for newcomers.

Who is the Doctor: The Unofficial Guide to Doctor Who: The New Series


Graeme Burk - 2012
    Covering the six seasons of the New Series, this is the essential companion for the most avid fan as well as the more casual viewer. Doctor Who was already the world's longest-running science fiction series when it returned in 2005 to huge success. An enormously popular series among genre fans in North America, Doctor Who encompasses horror, science fiction, comedy, action, and historical adventure, and is loved for its uniquely British wit and clever scripting. It's no wonder the series' hero, monsters, and even its theme song are pop culture icons. In this volume, Doctor Who experts Graeme Burk and Robert Smith? bring insights into everything from the history of everything Doctor Who, including Daleks, Cybermen, and the eight Classic Series Doctors, to a guide to every episode of the New Series. Allons-y!

TARDIS Eruditorum - A Critical History of Doctor Who Volume 1: William Hartnell


Elizabeth Sandifer - 2011
    TARDIS Eruditorum tells the ongoing story of Doctor Who from its beginnings in the 1960s to the present day, pushing beyond received wisdom and fan dogma to understand that story not just as the story of a geeky sci-fi show but as the story of an entire line of mystical, avant-garde, and radical British culture. It treats Doctor Who as a show that really is about everything that has ever happened, and everything that ever will. This volume focuses on the earliest years of the program, looking at how it emerged from the existing traditions of science fiction in the UK and how it quickly found its kinship with the emerging counterculture of the 1960s. Every essay from the Hartnell era has been revised and expanded from its original form, and the eight new essays exclusive to the collected edition have been augmented by a further eleven, providing nineteen book-exclusive essays on topics like what happened before An Unearthly Child, whether the lead character's name is really Doctor Who, and how David Whitaker created the idea of a Doctor Who novel. Plus, you'll learn: How acid-fueled occultism influenced the creation of the Cybermen. Why The Celestial Toymaker is irredeemably racist. The Problem of Susan Foreman

About Time 1: The Unauthorized Guide to Doctor Who


Tat Wood - 2006
    Written by Lawrence Miles (Faction Paradox) and long-time sci-fi commentator Tat Wood, About Time focuses on the continuity of Doctor Who (its characters, alien races and the like), but also examines the show as a work of social commentary. In particular, Miles and Wood dissect the politics and social issues that shaped the show during its unprecedented 26-year run (from 1963 to 1989), detailing how the issues of the day influenced this series. As part of this grand opus, About Time 1 examines Doctor Who Seasons 1 to 3 (1963 to 1966) -- the show's every beginnings, with William Hartnell in the lead role. Among other things, About Time 1 answers such vitally important Who questions as Where (and When) is Gallifrey? and Why Couldn't the BBC Just Have Spent More Money?

Monsters of the Week: The Complete Critical Companion to The X-Files


Zack Handlen - 2018
    Packed with insightful reviews of every episode—including the tenth and eleventh seasons and both major motion pictures—Monsters of the Week leaves no mystery unsolved and no monster unexplained. This crucial collection includes a foreword by series creator Chris Carter as well as exclusive interviews with some of show’s stars and screenwriters, including Carter, Vince Gilligan, Mitch Pileggi, James Wong, Robert Patrick, Darin Morgan, and more. Monsters of the Week is the definitive guide to The X-Files—whether you’re a lifelong viewer or a new fan uncovering the conspiracy for the first time.

Glued to the Box: Television Criticism from The Observer, 1979–82


Clive James - 1982
    This is a paperback edition of a volume first published by Jonathan Cape in 1983. Clive James' earlier volumes of TV criticism include Visions Before Midnight (1977 & 1981) and The Crystal Bucket (1983). They have been published in a single volume with a new introduction and index as Clive James on Television (1991).

Doctor Who: The TARDIS Handbook


Steve Tribe - 2010
    Everything you need to know about the TARDIS is here - where it came from, where it's been, how it works, and how it has changed since we first encountered it in a London junkyard in 1963.Including photos, design drawings, floor plans and instruction manuals from different eras of the series, this handbook explores the ship's endless interior, looking inside its wardrobe and bedrooms, its power rooms and sick bay, its corridors and cloisters, and revealing just how the show's production teams have created the dimensionally transcendental police box, inside and out.The TARDIS Handbook is the essential guide to the best ship in the universe.

Chicks Unravel Time: Women Journey Through Every Season of Doctor Who


Deborah StanishJuliet E. McKenna - 2012
    Myles bring together a host of award-winning female writers, media professionals and scientists to examine each season of new and classicDoctor Who from their unique perspectives.Diana Gabaldon discusses how Jamie McCrimmon inspired her best-selling Outlander series, and Barbara Hambly (Benjamin January Mysteries) examines the delicate balance of rebooting a TV show. Seanan McGuire (Toby Daye series) reveals the power and pain of waiting in Series 5, and Una McCormack (The King's Dragon) argues that Sylvester McCoy's final year of Doctor Who is the show's best season ever.Other contributors include Juliet E. McKenna (Einarrin series), Tansy Rayner Roberts (Power and Majesty), Sarah Lotz (The Mall), Martha Wells (The Cloud Roads), Joan Frances Turner (Dust), Rachel Swirsky ("Fields of Gold") and Aliette de Bodard (Obsidian and Blood series).

Doctor Who: The Visual Dictionary


Jason Loborik - 2007
    This highly successful title is now updated and expanded to include the latest Doctor Who lore from series three and four and the 2008 Christmas special.The book goes beyond the story lines to examine the characters, aliens, weapons and curiosities that are all in a day's work for the Doctor. Entries are illustrated with annotated photography and specially commissioned cross-section artworks. Doctor Who The Visual Dictionary updates the entries of old favorites like Davros and his Daleks, the rhino-headed Judoon and the Doctor's companions Martha Jones and Captain Jack. Forty additional pages introduce and explore all-new characters like the formidable Donna Noble, the Family of Blood and their Scarecrow Henchmen, the warmongering Sontaran and the childlike, but deadly, Toclafane.

Doctor Who: The Writer's Tale - The Final Chapter


Russell T. Davies - 2010
    For this extensively revised and updated paperback edition, Russell T Davies and Benjamin Cook continue their candid and in-depth correspondence to take in work on the last of Russell's 2009 specials - and the end of David Tennant's era as The Doctor - while also looking back to the achievements of the first three seasons. With over 300 pages of all-new material, including new photos and original artwork, The Writer's Tale is a fitting tribute to Russell T Davies' phenomenal achievement in bringing Doctor Who back for a new generation of fans.

Reading the Vampire Slayer: The Complete, Unofficial Guide to 'Buffy' and 'Angel'


Roz Kaveney - 2001
    This second edition is hugely revised and expanded to cover the sixth and seventh seasons of Buffy and the third and fourth seasons of Angel. It contains chapters on the relationship between Buffy and the lovelorn vampire Spike and on the thematic structure of Angel, as well as interviews on the writing of Buffy with scriptwriters Jane Espenson and Steven DeKnight. Individual chapters have been updated and the useful episode guide is expanded to cover all seven seasons of Buffy and the four seasons of Angel, as is Roz Kaveney's general introduction to the scenes and structures of each season.

Buffy Goes Dark: Essays on the Final Two Seasons of Buffy the Vampire Slayer on Television


Lynne Y. EdwardsAgnes B. Curry - 2008
    Its groundbreaking stylistic and thematic devices, boldness and wit earned it an intensely devoted fan base-and as it approached its zenith, attention from media watchdog groups and the Federal Communications Commission. The grim and provocative evolution of the show over its final two seasons polarized its audience, while also breaking new ground for critical and philosophical analysis. The thirteen essays in this collection, divided into the perspectives of feminist, cultural, auteur and fan studies, explore the popular series' conclusion, providing a multifaceted examination of Buffy's most controversial two seasons.

The Existential Joss Whedon: Evil and Human Freedom in Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel, Firefly and Serenity


J. Michael Richardson - 2006
    The authors argue that these works are part of an existentialist tradition that stretches back from the French atheistic existentialist Jean-Paul Sartre, through the Danish Christian existentialist Soren Kierkegaard, to the Russian novelist and existentialist Fyodor Dostoevsky. Whedon and Dostoevsky, for example, seem preoccupied with the problem of evil and human freedom. Both argue that in each and every one of us "a demon lies hidden." Whedon personifies these demons and has them wandering about and causing havoc. Dostoevsky treats the subject only slightly more seriously. Chapters cover such topics as Russian existentialism and vampire slayage; moral choices; ethics; Faith and bad faith; constructing reality through existential choice; some limitations of science and technology; love and self-sacrifice; love, witchcraft, and vengeance; soul mates and moral responsibility; love and moral choice; forms of freedom; and Whedon as moral philosopher.

The Quotable Doctor Who: Wise Words from Across Space and Time


Cavan Scott - 2014
    Now for the first time, fans can enjoy a plethora of their favorite memorable quotes and wisest words spoken throughout the series from the first episode to the most recent season starring Matt Smith. The Official Quotable Doctor Who is an insightful and unique look into the exciting universe of Doctor Who like never before!The quotes will be compiled into nine chapters that each focus on a reoccurring theme or subject from the series. The book includes hundreds of the series' most quoted words on the human race, tools, power, corruption, war, space travel, historical celebrities the Doctor and his encounters, and many more. It will also feature running artwork by popular Doctor Who Magazine illustrator Ben Morris. This book truly is a must have for the ultimate Doctor Who fan.