Writing the Blockbuster Novel


Albert Zuckerman - 1994
    And here Albert Zuckerman, agent and editorial advisor to many successful authors in every genre, discloses the somewhat hidden nuts and bolts of what makes this type of book tick, and shows how you, too, could write a novel that might sell in the millions. Zuckerman covers every aspect of writing the blockbuster novel (or the "big novel, " as it's called in the publishing world), including defining it. You'll learn how to develop and use an outline; the value of setting your novel in an exotic or unique world; how to choose and build your characters; to control point of view and use it as a technique for developing reader empathy; how to knit together the relationships between characters; the importance of confrontational scenes, and how to sustain them; how to build scenes while setting up suspense and maintaining current action; to weave plot strands in order to build maximal climaxes; to develop and use rhythm in your plotting; and what a story point is and how to make sure each chapter includes at least one. All of this is illustrated through numerous examples of current - and timeless - popular fiction, including the works of Ken Follett, Margaret Mitchell's "Gone With the Wind," Mario Puzo's "The Godfather" and others. If you aspire to write a big novel, then this book will be invaluable to you. Read it. Learn from it. And who knows? It could be your name on the best-seller's list.

Bonifacio's Bolo


Ambeth R. Ocampo - 1995
    In Bonifacio's Bolo, Ambeth Ocampo adds even more interesting bits to another scrapbook of history.

The Peshtigo Fire of 1871: The Story of the Deadliest Fire in American History


Charles River Editors - 2014
    What happened at Peshtigo makes Johnstown look like a birdbath." – Bill Lutz, co-author of Firestorm at Peshtigo "The air burned hotter than a crematorium and the fire traveled at 90 mph. I read an account of a Civil War veteran who had been through some of the worst battles of the war. He described the sound - the roar - during the fire as 100 times greater than any artillery bombardment.” – Bill Lutz In arguably the most famous fire in American history, a blaze in the southwestern section of Chicago began to burn out of control on the night of October 8, 1871. It had taken about 40 years for Chicago to grow from a small settlement of about 300 people into a thriving metropolis with a population of 300,000, but in just two days in 1871, much of that progress was burned to the ground. Due to the publicity generated by a fire that reduced most of a major American city to ash, the Peshtigo Fire of 1871 might fairly be called America’s forgotten disaster. Overshadowed by the much better covered and publicized Great Chicago Fire that occurred on the same evening, the fire that started in the Wisconsin logging town of Peshtigo generated a firestorm unlike anything in American history. In addition to destroying a wide swath of land, it killed at least 1,500 people and possibly as many as 2,500, several times more than the number of casualties in Chicago. While people marveled at the fact that the Great Chicago Fire managed to jump a river, the Peshtigo fire was so intense that it was able to jump several miles across Green Bay. While wondering aloud about the way in which the Peshtigo fire has been overlooked, Bill Lutz noted, "Fires are normally very fascinating to people, but people seem resistant to Peshtigo. Maybe Peshtigo is on such a large scale that people can't comprehend it." Ironically, while Peshtigo is widely forgotten, the fire there is often cited as proof that the Great Chicago Fire was caused by natural phenomena, such as a comet or meteor shower. Those advocating such a theory think it’s too coincidental that such disastrous fires were sparked in the same region on the same night, and they point to other fires across the Midwest. Of course, as with the Great Chicago Fire, contemporaries of the Peshtigo fire faulted human error and didn’t necessarily link the two fires, if only because fires were a common problem in both Peshtigo and Chicago during the 19th century. The Peshtigo Fire of 1871 chronicles the story America’s deadliest fire. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Peshtigo fire like never before, in no time at all.

Charles Goodnight: Cowman and Plainsman


J. Evetts Haley - 1981
    Charles Goodnight knew the West of Jim Bridger, Kit Carson, Dick Wooton, St. Vrain, and Lucien Maxwell. He ranged a country as vast as Bridger ranged. He rode with the boldness of Fremont, guided by the craft of Carson. His vigorous zest for life enabled him to live intensely and amply, and in this book by J. Evetts Haley, himself no stranger to the West, provides a fully readable and important western biography, vividly told, thrilling, witty, and completely authentic.

Queen Victoria: Icon Of An Era


Michael W. Simmons - 2017
    But this book takes the reader on a journey that starts before her marriage, before she came to be seen as the static icon of the age that bears her name. From her isolated childhood at Kensington Palace, where her daily life was controlled by a man who plotted to one day seize power through her, Victoria emerged shortly after her 18th birthday as a fully-fledged Queen, a young woman who gloried in her newfound power and freedom. Over the next twenty years, she fell in love—twice, if the rumors are to be believed—bore nine children, and kept a daily diary which recorded her private, inward struggles: how to reconcile her role as monarch with her duties as a wife and mother, how to protect her country and her throne in an age of revolution. Ultimately, readers of this book will discover how Queen Victoria redefined the monarchy for her own age—and afterwards.

Royal Family: Years of Transition


Theo Aronson - 1983
    It is a family saga showing the monarchy from the death of Queen Victoria to the present day. But rather than just an account of the reign of the five 20th-century monarchs, this is a study of their dynasty; of both its major and minor members. The entire royal family is vividly portrayed — with its triumphs and its heartbreaks, its brilliance and its mediocrity, its strengths and its vulnerabilities.The main theme explores the way in which, in over eighty years, the royal family has adapted to changing times in order not only to survive but to enhance its position in national and international life. It is an account of a royal house in the state of continuous transition; of a family deeply concerned with making itself relevant to contemporary life while retaining its essential element of mystique.Many other interesting themes also emerge: the education and upbringing of the royal children, the reconciling of public obligations with private inclinations, the constitutional position of the monarch, the frustrations of heirs-apparent, the varied and often onerous duties of family members, the composition of the royal households, the relationship with the press, the contrasting atmosphere of the different reigns, the marriages, the divorces, and the sometimes disastrous love affairs.Theo Aronson in writing this book has received an exceptional degree of cooperation from the Palace. He has been granted audiences with members of four generations of the royal family: the late Princess Alice, Countess of Athlone, the Queen Mother, Princess Margaret and the Prince of Wales. He has also had help from members of the various royal households — secretaries, comptrollers, press secretaries, equerries and ladies-in-waiting. The late C. P. Snow has described Theo Aronson's writing as 'bright with intelligence and human wisdom... very highly recommended'.

Little Known Facts About Well Known Places: Disneyland


David Hoffman - 2008
    

50 Photographers You Should Know


Peter Stepan - 2008
    From Félix Nadar to Nan Goldin, each of the photographers featured here represents an important aspect of photography's evolution. The artists are presented in double-page spreads that include reproductions of their most important works, concise biographies, informative sidebars, and a timeline that extends throughout the volume. The result is a fascinating overview of the way photographers continue to push the limits of their genre, offering their audiences new ways of seeing and understanding our world.

The Who: Maximum R&B


Richard Barnes - 1983
    The band themselves have assisted in this official illustrated record, contributing over 400 photographs (many never seen outside the pages of this book), press cuttings, album sleeves and posters. The Who: Maximum R&B also features complete UK and US discographies, including solo work by the individual members.First published in 1982 and now in its fifth edition, The Who: Maximum R&B is a colourful pictorial joyride widely accepted as the best book on the Who. Updated to detail the creative tensions and the chemistry that allowed the group to reform for one more time on their 2002 tour, it describes the untimely death of bassist John Entwistle on that same tour and features an Introduction by songwriter/guitarist Townshend on the loss of his friend and his own recent legal problems.

Martin Heidegger's Path of Thinking


Otto Pöggeler - 1963
    This book offers a rich introduction to Heidegger that reveals Poggeler's sound scholarship and philosophical criticism.

A Book of One's Own: People and Their Diaries


Thomas Mallon - 1984
    Mallon has written a new introduction for this edition which comments on the political consequences of keeping a journal, as in the former controversy involving Sen. Bob Packwood. A diarist himself, Mallon places journal writers in history, fleshing them out with both background and witty anecdote.

Maharaja


Diwan Jarmani Dass - 1969
    He was born in Punjab in 1895, was a minister in the Indian princely states of Kapurthala and Patiala. He was well-verse in Punjabi, Urdu, English and French. He was highly decorated by the Vatican and the Governments of France, Spain, Morocco, Egypt and many other countries. He was also decorated by the Rulers of Kapurthala, Patiala and Bhawalpur States.The book reveals amazing lifestyles of Maharajas and the royal families, their sex lives, lavish and extravagant spending on their comforts, etc. Though the majority of Maharajas were selfish and extravagant there had been some generous Maharajas as well. Some Maharajas were educated and intelligent while majority of them were just prodigals. All Maharajas had harems and huge palaces. Most of them were into expensive liquor. Though rare, some Maharajas had been very duty conscious and executed the state’s duties towards the subjects in a fair and just manner.Most of the Maharajas were highly interested in game hunting. They treat it as a way of showing chivalry. They did it in a highly organized manner.Politics of Maharajas were dirty most of the time. Cheating and betrayal are part and parcel of their politics. Diwan Jarmani Dass has been fiercely open and independent in revealing the secrets of Maharajas of yesteryear and we should be thankful to him for writing this exclusive book about Maharajas.

Standing In The Shadows Of Motown: The Life And Music Of Legendary Bassist James Jamerson


Dr. Licks - 1989
    His tumultuous life and musical brilliance are explored in depth through hundreds of interviews, 49 transcribed musical scores, two hours of recorded all-star performances, and more than 50 rarely seen photos in this stellar tribute to behind-the-scenes Motown. Features a 120-minute CD Allan Slutsky's 2002 documentary of the same name is the winner of the New York Film Critics "Best Documentary of the Year" award

Who Are You: The Life of Pete Townshend


Mark Wilkerson - 2006
    Author Mark Wilkerson interviewed Townshend himself and several of Townshend's friends and associates for this biography.

Why I Love New Orleans: A Collection of Blogs


Heather Graham - 2014
    She has used the city as a setting for many of her novels and there are many reasons why. On her blog in 2013 she spent 30 days sharing what she loved about New Orleans. From favorite restaurants, to museums she loves to her most loved ghost stories, she shared what made New Orleans one of her favorite cities in the United States. Now she has compiled these blogs into this ebook that she wants to share with those who are going to New Orleans, those who have dreamed of the city and want to learn more, and those who might want to debate her choices. Why I Love New Orleans is a love story, it's the story of Heather's love for this magical city.