Book picks similar to
Peregrine by Joan Elizabeth Goodman


historical-fiction
young-adult
historical
religion

Singing Hands


Delia Ray - 2006
    So when Gussie starts to hum through signed services in the summer of 1948, Reverend Davis assumes she merely wants to sing out loud and sends her to a regular church downtown. But Gussie’s behavior worsens, and she is not allowed to go on a much-anticipated trip; instead, she must help her father at the Alabama School for the Deaf.Rebelling against the strict rules of the school, Gussie finally confronts the difficulties and prejudices encountered by the deaf community, all while still trying to find her own identity in the worlds of both the hearing and the deaf.Drawing on firsthand accounts of her mother’s own childhood with deaf parents, Delia Ray provides an inside look at the South in the 1940s. Lively humor, unforgettable characters, and meticulous research combine to make this a standout novel that offers keen insight into what it means to be hearing in a deaf world. Author’s note.

A Cloud of Outrageous Blue


Vesper Stamper - 2020
    Suddenly sent to live in a priory and work with ancient texts, Edyth must come to terms with her new life and the gifts she discovers in herself. But outside the priory, something much worse is coming. With the reappearance of a boy from her past and the ominous Great Plague creeping closer and closer to the priory, it will be up to Edyth to rise above it all and save herself.From the award-winning author-illustrator of What the Night Sings comes a new journey of self-discovery and love in the most uncertain times.

That Fatal Night: The Titanic Diary of Dorothy Wilton


Sarah Ellis - 2011
    It is May 1912, one month after the horrific sinking of the Titanic, and twelve-year-old survivor Dorothy Wilton is sent home from school in disgrace when she strikes another student. Although she's expelled, her sympathetic teacher encourages Dorothy to write an account of her experience on the ship, with the hopes that it will help Dorothy come to terms with her trauma.And so begins a truly remarkable story, which reads like a time capsule of the era: Dorothy writes about visiting her bohemian grandparents in England before setting sail back home, the luxurious rooms and cabins on board, a new friend she makes, and the intriguing people they observe. However, amidst all of this storytelling, a shadow lurks, a secret Dorothy is too traumatized to acknowledge - a secret about her own actions on that fatal night, which may have had deadly consequences.Through young Dorothy's eyes, award-winning writer Sarah Ellis expertly takes a unique perspective on the Titanic tragedy, exploring the concept of survivor's guilt with devastating honesty.

Evvy's Civil War


Miriam Brenaman - 2002
    It is time for her to be introduced to society-no more climbing fences and jumping into streams. She is expected to be a lady now. But Evvy has an agenda of her own, questions of her own, and soon finds answers of her own too. She wants to prove that a woman can do everything a man can, and still be a true woman. But in order to find out all she needs to know, and keep her family together as the war rages around them, she must uncover her family's secrets, and ultimately make impossible choices. Evvy's fascinating story of honor, love and a little sneakiness is based on the real diaries of Civil War-era women, whose legacy became the next generation of feminists, the suffragettes. More than that, she is an independent-minded heroine whose thoughts and ideas shed a new light on what it meant to be southern and female during the Civil War.

No Moon


Irene N. Watts - 2010
    Then everything changes. The family decides to sail to New York aboard the Titanic. An accident to the children's nanny, only days prior to the sailing, means that Louisa must go in her stead. She cannot refuse, although she dreads even the mention of the ocean. Memories she has suppressed, except in nightmares, come crowding back.When Louisa was five and her sister seven years old, their two-year-old brother died on an outing to the seaside. Since that time, Louisa has had a fear of the ocean. She blames herself for the accident, though she has been told it wasn't her fault.If Louisa refuses to go on the voyage, she will be dismissed, and she will never get beyond the working-class life she has escaped from.How Louisa learns self-reliance, overcomes her fears, and goes beyond what is expected of a girl makes No Moon an unforgettable story.

Pocket Full of Seeds


Marilyn Sachs - 1973
    Then one awful day Nicole comes home from school to find her entire family gone. The Nazis who have taken them are still looking for her. Where can she hide? "A significant addition to the collection of children's books dealing with World War II".--The Boston Globe. An ALA Notable Book; a New York Times Outstanding Children's Book of the Year.

A Heart for Any Fate: Westward to Oregon, 1845


Linda Crew - 2005
    West. The sound of a wish in a single word. That's how seventeen-year-old Lovisa King put it that spring of 1845 as she set off with her parents, eleven of her siblings, and their assorted spouses and children for Oregon Country, the promised land. From the opening lines, the reader is immersed in the excitement, challenges, exhaustion and elation, triumphs and tragedies of the journey, as an oft-told tale takes on a new freshness, seen through the eyes and the heart of this gritty young woman. Lovisa King is a flesh-and-blood teenager-feisty, funny, and wise beyond her years. With the crossing as catalyst, we watch her mature from a headstrong girl to a young woman beginning her adult life in the Kings Valley of western Oregon, a goal attained only through the harshest of sacrifices. The importance of this novel's historical terrain-the Oregon Trail--cannot be disputed. Neither can the importance of its human terrain-loss of innocence, alteration of long-held attitudes toward the other, emerging concepts of love and family. dramatic, personal, and gripping way.

Whispers of War: The War of 1812 Diary of Susanna Merritt


Kit Pearson - 2002
    When war breaks out between the United States and Great Britain in 1812, eleven-year-old Susanna chronicles her experiences when her father and brother go off to fight leaving the women to fend for themselves on the family farm on the Niagara Peninsula of Upper Canada.

Constance: A Story of Early Plymouth


Patricia Clapp - 1975
    Constance longs for her beloved London, but she does her share to help the pilgrim settles fight disease, tame the landscape, and befriend the natives. The village of Plymouth grows as more settlers arrive. Many of the young men have eyes for Constance. Could there possibly be room for romance in this wild new place?

The Braid


Helen Frost - 2006
    Each sister - Jeannie, who leaves Scotland during the Highland Clearances with her father, mother, and the younger children, and Sarah, who hides so she can stay behind with her grandmother - carries a length of the other's hair braided with her own. The braid binds them together when they are worlds apart and reminds them of who they used to be before they were evicted from the Western Isles, where their family had lived for many generations.The award-winning poet Helen Frost eloquently twists strand over strand of language, braiding the words at the edges of the poems to bring new poetic forms to life while intertwining the destinies of two young girls and the people who cross their paths in this unforgettable novel. An author's note describes the inventive poetic form in detail.The Braid is a 2007 Bank Street - Best Children's Book of the Year.

Eleanor: Crown Jewel of Aquitaine, France, 1136


Kristiana Gregory - 2002
    Their mother died several years earlier, so their grandmother and ladies-in-waiting raise the girls. Eleanor is extremely intelligent and literate, having been carefully educated by royal tutors. Spinning bores her, as does weaving, sewing, and other housewifery skills expected of her. She would rather be a knight and ride off to war. In fact, in 1136, when her father is invited to help invade Normandy,

Four Steps to Death


John Wilson - 2005
    Their story is told over seven days of fierce and deadly street-by-street fighting. Vasily is a patriotic Russian soldier determined to rid his country of the hated Nazi invaders -- if he can stay alive long enough. Conrad is a German tank officer, part of the seemingly unstoppable force sweeping eastward over the steppe, expecting a quick victory over Stalin's ill-trained and badly equipped army. Between them is eight-year-old Sergei, whose home is the maze of rubble that used to be the city of Stalingrad. None of them can know that their fates will be intertwined as the cataclysm engulfs them.

Dogboy


Christopher Russell - 2005
    He plays with them, eats with them, and sleeps in their den. Brind understands dogs better than he understands any human.GlaiveThe largest and most powerful dog in the pack, Glaive is Brind's best friend. He would do anything for the dog boy, even race straight into battle.AurélieThrown out of her home as the French army prepares for the English invasion, Aurélie can either beg outside the town wall with her mother, or fight the enemy herself. She has never been one to sit still.When the English and French armies clash at the Battle of Crécy, there will be honor, treachery, loss, chivalry—and glory. For Brind, Glaive, and Aurélie, this is only the beginning.

Joan of Arc


Michael Morpurgo - 1998
    Like Joan before her, she hears a voice—one that tells her the story of Joan of Arc as no one has heard it before. . . . Slip back in time with Eloise, and meet Joan, a seemingly ordinary French girl who hears the voices of saints and is called upon by God to save her country from the English. She faces this challenge with fierce determination, astounding courage, and unflagging faith. Her victories—and the price she paid for them—have never been forgotten.

If I Just Had Two Wings


Virginia Frances Schwartz - 2001
    As she dances, she loses all memory of being born a slave on an Alabama plantation. She lifts up her feet and flies high above the fields, as light as air. Before her a single white star shines.Thirteen-year-old Phoebe has always dreamed of leaving her life as a slave behind. She has heard whispers about a secret path to freedom, and she has seen what can happen to those who take it and fail. But freedom means more to Phoebe than anything, and when she meets Liney, a strong young woman who picks cotton next to her, they form a plan to escape together.One night, Poebe, Liney, and Liney's two small children flee under cover of darkness. Following clues from the songs and stories they have heard, the runaways elude slave catchers and reach the first stop on the Underground Railroad. It is only one safe house in a chain that leads all the way north to Canada. But between them and freedom, lie miles and miles of unfriendly country and dangers too horrible to imagine.Winner, Silver Birch Award, 2002Winner, Geoffrey Bilson Award for Historical FictionA 2005 New York Public Library selection for Books for the Teen Age